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British universities with the most foreign students

British universities with the most foreign students
The UK is one of the most popular countries in the world for international students. Every year tens of thousands of international students flock to the UK in search of a British Education. These students make a large contribution to the UK’s economy with some figures estimated to be in excess of £10 billion in 2014. An article by the Guardian pointed out that British universities spent over £120 million to recruit students from overseas to study in the UK. Students are recruited from all across the world both from inside and outside of the EU to study in many cities and towns across the country.

In our article today, we are looking at British universities with the largest percentage of undergraduate foreign students enrolled.

10. City University London
Percentage of overseas students: 28.13%

Students from other EU countries: 940
Students from outside the EU: 1,910

09. Heriot-Watt University
Percentage of overseas students: 31.37%

Students from other EU countries: 725
Students from outside the EU: 1,350

8. University College London
Percentage of overseas students: 36.75%

Students from other EU countries:1,155
Students from outside the EU: 3,805

7. Imperial College London
Percentage of overseas students: 37.57%

Students from other EU countries:1,015
Students from outside the EU: 2,385

6. University of the Arts
Percentage of overseas students: 37.81%

Students from other EU countries: 1,535
Students from outside the EU: 3,730

5. School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)
Percentage of overseas students: 39.39%

Students from other EU countries: 420
Students from outside the EU: 750

4. Glyndwr University
Percentage of overseas students: 39.84%

Students from other EU countries: 1,320
Students from outside the EU: 1,915

3. University of St Andrews
Percentage of overseas students: 41.63%

Students from other EU countries: 880
Students from outside the EU: 2,365

2. London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
Percentage of overseas students: 44.64%

Students from other EU countries: 285
Students from outside the EU: 1,505

1. University of Buckingham
Percentage of overseas students: 56.35%

Students from other EU countries: 140
Students from outside the EU: 570

Do you want to study at a UK university? Burlington School of English can help you to get the English certification you need to study in the UK. Contact us now!

Five competency interview questions you should be prepared to answer

 

Five competency interview questions you should be prepared to answer

Competency questions have become a popular part of interviewing. Most recruiters often begin a question with “tell me about a time”, or “give an example of how”, these forms of questions have become integral in the interviewing process.
In the past, candidates were usually asked to speculate what they would do in certain situations. However, today candidates are asked to provide specific examples of situations that have actually occurred, and use real-world examples to illustrate their own characteristics.
To help you prepare some of these types of questions. Here are five competency questions which you should be prepared to answer at an interview.
Tell me about a time you supported a member of your team who was struggling
Whilst it may seem like a pretty straightforward competency-based question, there is actually one big consideration for you to think about when selecting your own story, one which goes far beyond the typical STAR method of answering.

After all, while many companies rightly value teamwork and empathy in their staff, the cold, hard truth is that helping and caring still has to be seen to benefit to their bottom line.
The best interviewees answer this question by not only stressing how they may have supported a colleague in crisis, but also how their support translated into higher performance for the company.

Nice people are great. But it’s what you will bring to the business that really counts.

Good answer: ‘My job comes with a fair amount of analysis on a day-to-day basis, which means I’m pretty confident using software like Excel. One of my newer colleagues didn’t have much experience and was having a tough time with their reporting, so I offered to help out a few days after work to get him up to speed. Since then, he’s never had a problem with reporting, and I’ve never had a problem getting a drink if he’s at the bar.’

Bad answer: ‘Team? If I’m honest, I like to think of myself as more of a one man wolf pack…’

Give an example of a time you’ve had to improvise to achieve your goal
Translation: Can you think on your feet?

Think of this question as a kind of horrible hybrid between a curveball, and a classic competency question. Recruiters like this question because it takes candidates out of their comfort zones to see how they cope under pressure, whilst simultaneously asking for real-life experience to back-up what they say.

Recruiters will be paying keen attention to your answer, since every answer has the potential to reveal something new about your personality. Improvisation is all about facing the chaos. If you can handle the unexpected and overcome fear of failure to come out swinging, the way you answer almost becomes as important as the answer itself.

Well, almost..

Good answer: ‘My previous company often hosted client conferences, which were an important revenue driver for the business. For each event we booked an MC to introduce speakers and keep things entertaining. At a conference last year, to my horror, our scheduled MC came down with food poisoning the night before the event. We were too close to the event to find a replacement, so as the event manager, it fell to me to fill in. I was incredibly nervous, but after a lot of deep breaths and a little practice backstage, and I got through it. I had some great feedback, and my presenting skills even improved as a result, which was a bonus.

Bad answer: ‘I improvised a lot on my CV to get this interview…’

Why are you a good fit for the company?
Let’s face it: everyone wants to be wanted.
And, whether we like to admit it or not, recruiters are no different. Recruiters are under no illusion in thinking that their interview is the only one that you may have, however people who are simply playing the field and seeing what’s out there are always less likely to impress
The way a great candidate stands out when answering this question is by not just selling themselves for the role, but also stating exactly why you would make a perfect match for the business.
If you’ve done their homework correctly, you’ll have a blueprint in exactly what the company’s values are. You’ll then use your own skills, accomplishments and personality and tie them in with everything you’ve learned to hack together the perfect response.

Good answer: ‘Based on the research I’ve done about your company, you’re an organisation that really values staying on the cutting edge of technology. I was especially impressed with some of the technical details I read about the XYZ project. I think there’s a really good fit between my interest in evolving my own skills and technical knowledge, and the fact that your firm is known for continual technical improvements. That’s one reason I’m really excited to have the opportunity to work here’

Bad answer: ‘You have a job. I need a job. Put your hands together, and everyone’s a winner’

Which websites do you use personally? Why?
The secret to answering this one directly relates to the role that is being advertised.
If recruiters are looking to fill a traditional role in a less tech-savvy kind of business, they may use this question as the perfect opportunity to see how you keep abreast of the latest industry trends, or what you’re passionate about outside of the office.

However, recruiters may even oblige if you wish to show off your techie credentials. It could be a rundown of apps on your iPhone home screen, your preferred blogging platform, or which forums you frequent to keep your coding knowledge up-to-date.

Think of it as another chance to show what really motivates you.

Good answer: ‘I probably check websites like TechCrunch and Mashable about once a day. They’re a great source of news about a wide range of industries, and definitely help me keep-up with any particular tech-heavy chats around the coffee machine.’

Bad answer: ‘I’m a pretty big fan of Facebook. By the way, did you get my friend request?’

If you were offered the job, what’s the first thing you’d change?
Ah, finally a loaded question…

If recruiters specifically want someone to do a turnaround job, or if they have given you the sense that the role is focussed on making changes, then you may be asked to highlight some specific areas for improvement. This will allow you to highlight the impact you will bring to the company if you are hired.

However, the real skill here lies in answering without completely disregarding the experience and opinions of your prospective team. Recruiters are looking for people who tactfully try and get their point across. They are not looking for bullies.

A good answer should stress consultation and the need for information gathering, rather than recommending wholesale changes. Words like evolve, add, contribute and develop can be more effective than change, transform, overhaul or fix.

And with this question, more than any other, less is more. Because no-one wants to hire a know-it-all…

Good answer: ‘I can see from the job description that part of this role will involve helping to manage the company’s social media channels. I noticed in my research that you don’t post very often, and the tone seems a little inconsistent. I’d be looking to help develop a more reliable voice and personality for the brand, to help set us apart from the competition.’

Bad answer: ‘Where do I start?/I’m glad you asked. I’ve bought along a thirty-seven slide PowerPoint presentation detailing each change. Can someone dim the lights?’

Written with information sourced from Reed Recruitment. Visit reed.co.uk to find jobs in the UK

 

Five competency interview questions you should be prepared to answer

Competency questions have become a popular part of interviewing. Most recruiters often begin a question with “tell me about a time”, or “give an example of how”, these forms of questions have become integral in the interviewing process.
In the past, candidates were usually asked to speculate what they would do in certain situations. However, today candidates are asked to provide specific examples of situations that have actually occurred, and use real-world examples to illustrate their own characteristics.
To help you prepare some of these types of questions. Here are five competency questions which you should be prepared to answer at an interview.
Tell me about a time you supported a member of your team who was struggling
Whilst it may seem like a pretty straightforward competency-based question, there is actually one big consideration for you to think about when selecting your own story, one which goes far beyond the typical STAR method of answering.

After all, while many companies rightly value teamwork and empathy in their staff, the cold, hard truth is that helping and caring still has to be seen to benefit to their bottom line.
The best interviewees answer this question by not only stressing how they may have supported a colleague in crisis, but also how their support translated into higher performance for the company.

Nice people are great. But it’s what you will bring to the business that really counts.

Good answer: ‘My job comes with a fair amount of analysis on a day-to-day basis, which means I’m pretty confident using software like Excel. One of my newer colleagues didn’t have much experience and was having a tough time with their reporting, so I offered to help out a few days after work to get him up to speed. Since then, he’s never had a problem with reporting, and I’ve never had a problem getting a drink if he’s at the bar.’

Bad answer: ‘Team? If I’m honest, I like to think of myself as more of a one man wolf pack…’

Give an example of a time you’ve had to improvise to achieve your goal
Translation: Can you think on your feet?

Think of this question as a kind of horrible hybrid between a curveball, and a classic competency question. Recruiters like this question because it takes candidates out of their comfort zones to see how they cope under pressure, whilst simultaneously asking for real-life experience to back-up what they say.

Recruiters will be paying keen attention to your answer, since every answer has the potential to reveal something new about your personality. Improvisation is all about facing the chaos. If you can handle the unexpected and overcome fear of failure to come out swinging, the way you answer almost becomes as important as the answer itself.

Well, almost..

Good answer: ‘My previous company often hosted client conferences, which were an important revenue driver for the business. For each event we booked an MC to introduce speakers and keep things entertaining. At a conference last year, to my horror, our scheduled MC came down with food poisoning the night before the event. We were too close to the event to find a replacement, so as the event manager, it fell to me to fill in. I was incredibly nervous, but after a lot of deep breaths and a little practice backstage, and I got through it. I had some great feedback, and my presenting skills even improved as a result, which was a bonus.

Bad answer: ‘I improvised a lot on my CV to get this interview…’

Why are you a good fit for the company?
Let’s face it: everyone wants to be wanted.
And, whether we like to admit it or not, recruiters are no different. Recruiters are under no illusion in thinking that their interview is the only one that you may have, however people who are simply playing the field and seeing what’s out there are always less likely to impress
The way a great candidate stands out when answering this question is by not just selling themselves for the role, but also stating exactly why you would make a perfect match for the business.
If you’ve done their homework correctly, you’ll have a blueprint in exactly what the company’s values are. You’ll then use your own skills, accomplishments and personality and tie them in with everything you’ve learned to hack together the perfect response.

Good answer: ‘Based on the research I’ve done about your company, you’re an organisation that really values staying on the cutting edge of technology. I was especially impressed with some of the technical details I read about the XYZ project. I think there’s a really good fit between my interest in evolving my own skills and technical knowledge, and the fact that your firm is known for continual technical improvements. That’s one reason I’m really excited to have the opportunity to work here’

Bad answer: ‘You have a job. I need a job. Put your hands together, and everyone’s a winner’

Which websites do you use personally? Why?
The secret to answering this one directly relates to the role that is being advertised.
If recruiters are looking to fill a traditional role in a less tech-savvy kind of business, they may use this question as the perfect opportunity to see how you keep abreast of the latest industry trends, or what you’re passionate about outside of the office.

However, recruiters may even oblige if you wish to show off your techie credentials. It could be a rundown of apps on your iPhone home screen, your preferred blogging platform, or which forums you frequent to keep your coding knowledge up-to-date.

Think of it as another chance to show what really motivates you.

Good answer: ‘I probably check websites like TechCrunch and Mashable about once a day. They’re a great source of news about a wide range of industries, and definitely help me keep-up with any particular tech-heavy chats around the coffee machine.’

Bad answer: ‘I’m a pretty big fan of Facebook. By the way, did you get my friend request?’

If you were offered the job, what’s the first thing you’d change?
Ah, finally a loaded question…

If recruiters specifically want someone to do a turnaround job, or if they have given you the sense that the role is focussed on making changes, then you may be asked to highlight some specific areas for improvement. This will allow you to highlight the impact you will bring to the company if you are hired.

However, the real skill here lies in answering without completely disregarding the experience and opinions of your prospective team. Recruiters are looking for people who tactfully try and get their point across. They are not looking for bullies.

A good answer should stress consultation and the need for information gathering, rather than recommending wholesale changes. Words like evolve, add, contribute and develop can be more effective than change, transform, overhaul or fix.

And with this question, more than any other, less is more. Because no-one wants to hire a know-it-all…

Good answer: ‘I can see from the job description that part of this role will involve helping to manage the company’s social media channels. I noticed in my research that you don’t post very often, and the tone seems a little inconsistent. I’d be looking to help develop a more reliable voice and personality for the brand, to help set us apart from the competition.’

Bad answer: ‘Where do I start?/I’m glad you asked. I’ve bought along a thirty-seven slide PowerPoint presentation detailing each change. Can someone dim the lights?’

Written with information sourced from Reed Recruitment. Visit reed.co.uk to find jobs in the UK

 

Five competency interview questions you should be prepared to answer

Competency questions have become a popular part of interviewing. Most recruiters often begin a question with “tell me about a time”, or “give an example of how”, these forms of questions have become integral in the interviewing process.
In the past, candidates were usually asked to speculate what they would do in certain situations. However, today candidates are asked to provide specific examples of situations that have actually occurred, and use real-world examples to illustrate their own characteristics.
To help you prepare some of these types of questions. Here are five competency questions which you should be prepared to answer at an interview.
Tell me about a time you supported a member of your team who was struggling
Whilst it may seem like a pretty straightforward competency-based question, there is actually one big consideration for you to think about when selecting your own story, one which goes far beyond the typical STAR method of answering.

After all, while many companies rightly value teamwork and empathy in their staff, the cold, hard truth is that helping and caring still has to be seen to benefit to their bottom line.
The best interviewees answer this question by not only stressing how they may have supported a colleague in crisis, but also how their support translated into higher performance for the company.

Nice people are great. But it’s what you will bring to the business that really counts.

Good answer: ‘My job comes with a fair amount of analysis on a day-to-day basis, which means I’m pretty confident using software like Excel. One of my newer colleagues didn’t have much experience and was having a tough time with their reporting, so I offered to help out a few days after work to get him up to speed. Since then, he’s never had a problem with reporting, and I’ve never had a problem getting a drink if he’s at the bar.’

Bad answer: ‘Team? If I’m honest, I like to think of myself as more of a one man wolf pack…’

Give an example of a time you’ve had to improvise to achieve your goal
Translation: Can you think on your feet?

Think of this question as a kind of horrible hybrid between a curveball, and a classic competency question. Recruiters like this question because it takes candidates out of their comfort zones to see how they cope under pressure, whilst simultaneously asking for real-life experience to back-up what they say.

Recruiters will be paying keen attention to your answer, since every answer has the potential to reveal something new about your personality. Improvisation is all about facing the chaos. If you can handle the unexpected and overcome fear of failure to come out swinging, the way you answer almost becomes as important as the answer itself.

Well, almost..

Good answer: ‘My previous company often hosted client conferences, which were an important revenue driver for the business. For each event we booked an MC to introduce speakers and keep things entertaining. At a conference last year, to my horror, our scheduled MC came down with food poisoning the night before the event. We were too close to the event to find a replacement, so as the event manager, it fell to me to fill in. I was incredibly nervous, but after a lot of deep breaths and a little practice backstage, and I got through it. I had some great feedback, and my presenting skills even improved as a result, which was a bonus.

Bad answer: ‘I improvised a lot on my CV to get this interview…’

Why are you a good fit for the company?
Let’s face it: everyone wants to be wanted.
And, whether we like to admit it or not, recruiters are no different. Recruiters are under no illusion in thinking that their interview is the only one that you may have, however people who are simply playing the field and seeing what’s out there are always less likely to impress
The way a great candidate stands out when answering this question is by not just selling themselves for the role, but also stating exactly why you would make a perfect match for the business.
If you’ve done their homework correctly, you’ll have a blueprint in exactly what the company’s values are. You’ll then use your own skills, accomplishments and personality and tie them in with everything you’ve learned to hack together the perfect response.

Good answer: ‘Based on the research I’ve done about your company, you’re an organisation that really values staying on the cutting edge of technology. I was especially impressed with some of the technical details I read about the XYZ project. I think there’s a really good fit between my interest in evolving my own skills and technical knowledge, and the fact that your firm is known for continual technical improvements. That’s one reason I’m really excited to have the opportunity to work here’

Bad answer: ‘You have a job. I need a job. Put your hands together, and everyone’s a winner’

Which websites do you use personally? Why?
The secret to answering this one directly relates to the role that is being advertised.
If recruiters are looking to fill a traditional role in a less tech-savvy kind of business, they may use this question as the perfect opportunity to see how you keep abreast of the latest industry trends, or what you’re passionate about outside of the office.

However, recruiters may even oblige if you wish to show off your techie credentials. It could be a rundown of apps on your iPhone home screen, your preferred blogging platform, or which forums you frequent to keep your coding knowledge up-to-date.

Think of it as another chance to show what really motivates you.

Good answer: ‘I probably check websites like TechCrunch and Mashable about once a day. They’re a great source of news about a wide range of industries, and definitely help me keep-up with any particular tech-heavy chats around the coffee machine.’

Bad answer: ‘I’m a pretty big fan of Facebook. By the way, did you get my friend request?’

If you were offered the job, what’s the first thing you’d change?
Ah, finally a loaded question…

If recruiters specifically want someone to do a turnaround job, or if they have given you the sense that the role is focussed on making changes, then you may be asked to highlight some specific areas for improvement. This will allow you to highlight the impact you will bring to the company if you are hired.

However, the real skill here lies in answering without completely disregarding the experience and opinions of your prospective team. Recruiters are looking for people who tactfully try and get their point across. They are not looking for bullies.

A good answer should stress consultation and the need for information gathering, rather than recommending wholesale changes. Words like evolve, add, contribute and develop can be more effective than change, transform, overhaul or fix.

And with this question, more than any other, less is more. Because no-one wants to hire a know-it-all…

Good answer: ‘I can see from the job description that part of this role will involve helping to manage the company’s social media channels. I noticed in my research that you don’t post very often, and the tone seems a little inconsistent. I’d be looking to help develop a more reliable voice and personality for the brand, to help set us apart from the competition.’

Bad answer: ‘Where do I start?/I’m glad you asked. I’ve bought along a thirty-seven slide PowerPoint presentation detailing each change. Can someone dim the lights?’

Written with information sourced from Reed Recruitment. Visit reed.co.uk to find jobs in the UK

 

Five competency interview questions you should be prepared to answer

Competency questions have become a popular part of interviewing. Most recruiters often begin a question with “tell me about a time”, or “give an example of how”, these forms of questions have become integral in the interviewing process.
In the past, candidates were usually asked to speculate what they would do in certain situations. However, today candidates are asked to provide specific examples of situations that have actually occurred, and use real-world examples to illustrate their own characteristics.
To help you prepare some of these types of questions. Here are five competency questions which you should be prepared to answer at an interview.
Tell me about a time you supported a member of your team who was struggling
Whilst it may seem like a pretty straightforward competency-based question, there is actually one big consideration for you to think about when selecting your own story, one which goes far beyond the typical STAR method of answering.

After all, while many companies rightly value teamwork and empathy in their staff, the cold, hard truth is that helping and caring still has to be seen to benefit to their bottom line.
The best interviewees answer this question by not only stressing how they may have supported a colleague in crisis, but also how their support translated into higher performance for the company.

Nice people are great. But it’s what you will bring to the business that really counts.

Good answer: ‘My job comes with a fair amount of analysis on a day-to-day basis, which means I’m pretty confident using software like Excel. One of my newer colleagues didn’t have much experience and was having a tough time with their reporting, so I offered to help out a few days after work to get him up to speed. Since then, he’s never had a problem with reporting, and I’ve never had a problem getting a drink if he’s at the bar.’

Bad answer: ‘Team? If I’m honest, I like to think of myself as more of a one man wolf pack…’

Give an example of a time you’ve had to improvise to achieve your goal
Translation: Can you think on your feet?

Think of this question as a kind of horrible hybrid between a curveball, and a classic competency question. Recruiters like this question because it takes candidates out of their comfort zones to see how they cope under pressure, whilst simultaneously asking for real-life experience to back-up what they say.

Recruiters will be paying keen attention to your answer, since every answer has the potential to reveal something new about your personality. Improvisation is all about facing the chaos. If you can handle the unexpected and overcome fear of failure to come out swinging, the way you answer almost becomes as important as the answer itself.

Well, almost..

Good answer: ‘My previous company often hosted client conferences, which were an important revenue driver for the business. For each event we booked an MC to introduce speakers and keep things entertaining. At a conference last year, to my horror, our scheduled MC came down with food poisoning the night before the event. We were too close to the event to find a replacement, so as the event manager, it fell to me to fill in. I was incredibly nervous, but after a lot of deep breaths and a little practice backstage, and I got through it. I had some great feedback, and my presenting skills even improved as a result, which was a bonus.

Bad answer: ‘I improvised a lot on my CV to get this interview…’

Why are you a good fit for the company?
Let’s face it: everyone wants to be wanted.
And, whether we like to admit it or not, recruiters are no different. Recruiters are under no illusion in thinking that their interview is the only one that you may have, however people who are simply playing the field and seeing what’s out there are always less likely to impress
The way a great candidate stands out when answering this question is by not just selling themselves for the role, but also stating exactly why you would make a perfect match for the business.
If you’ve done their homework correctly, you’ll have a blueprint in exactly what the company’s values are. You’ll then use your own skills, accomplishments and personality and tie them in with everything you’ve learned to hack together the perfect response.

Good answer: ‘Based on the research I’ve done about your company, you’re an organisation that really values staying on the cutting edge of technology. I was especially impressed with some of the technical details I read about the XYZ project. I think there’s a really good fit between my interest in evolving my own skills and technical knowledge, and the fact that your firm is known for continual technical improvements. That’s one reason I’m really excited to have the opportunity to work here’

Bad answer: ‘You have a job. I need a job. Put your hands together, and everyone’s a winner’

Which websites do you use personally? Why?
The secret to answering this one directly relates to the role that is being advertised.
If recruiters are looking to fill a traditional role in a less tech-savvy kind of business, they may use this question as the perfect opportunity to see how you keep abreast of the latest industry trends, or what you’re passionate about outside of the office.

However, recruiters may even oblige if you wish to show off your techie credentials. It could be a rundown of apps on your iPhone home screen, your preferred blogging platform, or which forums you frequent to keep your coding knowledge up-to-date.

Think of it as another chance to show what really motivates you.

Good answer: ‘I probably check websites like TechCrunch and Mashable about once a day. They’re a great source of news about a wide range of industries, and definitely help me keep-up with any particular tech-heavy chats around the coffee machine.’

Bad answer: ‘I’m a pretty big fan of Facebook. By the way, did you get my friend request?’

If you were offered the job, what’s the first thing you’d change?
Ah, finally a loaded question…

If recruiters specifically want someone to do a turnaround job, or if they have given you the sense that the role is focussed on making changes, then you may be asked to highlight some specific areas for improvement. This will allow you to highlight the impact you will bring to the company if you are hired.

However, the real skill here lies in answering without completely disregarding the experience and opinions of your prospective team. Recruiters are looking for people who tactfully try and get their point across. They are not looking for bullies.

A good answer should stress consultation and the need for information gathering, rather than recommending wholesale changes. Words like evolve, add, contribute and develop can be more effective than change, transform, overhaul or fix.

And with this question, more than any other, less is more. Because no-one wants to hire a know-it-all…

Good answer: ‘I can see from the job description that part of this role will involve helping to manage the company’s social media channels. I noticed in my research that you don’t post very often, and the tone seems a little inconsistent. I’d be looking to help develop a more reliable voice and personality for the brand, to help set us apart from the competition.’

Bad answer: ‘Where do I start?/I’m glad you asked. I’ve bought along a thirty-seven slide PowerPoint presentation detailing each change. Can someone dim the lights?’

Written with information sourced from Reed Recruitment. Visit reed.co.uk to find jobs in the UK

 

Five competency interview questions you should be prepared to answer

Competency questions have become a popular part of interviewing. Most recruiters often begin a question with “tell me about a time”, or “give an example of how”, these forms of questions have become integral in the interviewing process.
In the past, candidates were usually asked to speculate what they would do in certain situations. However, today candidates are asked to provide specific examples of situations that have actually occurred, and use real-world examples to illustrate their own characteristics.
To help you prepare some of these types of questions. Here are five competency questions which you should be prepared to answer at an interview.
Tell me about a time you supported a member of your team who was struggling
Whilst it may seem like a pretty straightforward competency-based question, there is actually one big consideration for you to think about when selecting your own story, one which goes far beyond the typical STAR method of answering.

After all, while many companies rightly value teamwork and empathy in their staff, the cold, hard truth is that helping and caring still has to be seen to benefit to their bottom line.
The best interviewees answer this question by not only stressing how they may have supported a colleague in crisis, but also how their support translated into higher performance for the company.

Nice people are great. But it’s what you will bring to the business that really counts.

Good answer: ‘My job comes with a fair amount of analysis on a day-to-day basis, which means I’m pretty confident using software like Excel. One of my newer colleagues didn’t have much experience and was having a tough time with their reporting, so I offered to help out a few days after work to get him up to speed. Since then, he’s never had a problem with reporting, and I’ve never had a problem getting a drink if he’s at the bar.’

Bad answer: ‘Team? If I’m honest, I like to think of myself as more of a one man wolf pack…’

Give an example of a time you’ve had to improvise to achieve your goal
Translation: Can you think on your feet?

Think of this question as a kind of horrible hybrid between a curveball, and a classic competency question. Recruiters like this question because it takes candidates out of their comfort zones to see how they cope under pressure, whilst simultaneously asking for real-life experience to back-up what they say.

Recruiters will be paying keen attention to your answer, since every answer has the potential to reveal something new about your personality. Improvisation is all about facing the chaos. If you can handle the unexpected and overcome fear of failure to come out swinging, the way you answer almost becomes as important as the answer itself.

Well, almost..

Good answer: ‘My previous company often hosted client conferences, which were an important revenue driver for the business. For each event we booked an MC to introduce speakers and keep things entertaining. At a conference last year, to my horror, our scheduled MC came down with food poisoning the night before the event. We were too close to the event to find a replacement, so as the event manager, it fell to me to fill in. I was incredibly nervous, but after a lot of deep breaths and a little practice backstage, and I got through it. I had some great feedback, and my presenting skills even improved as a result, which was a bonus.

Bad answer: ‘I improvised a lot on my CV to get this interview…’

Why are you a good fit for the company?
Let’s face it: everyone wants to be wanted.
And, whether we like to admit it or not, recruiters are no different. Recruiters are under no illusion in thinking that their interview is the only one that you may have, however people who are simply playing the field and seeing what’s out there are always less likely to impress
The way a great candidate stands out when answering this question is by not just selling themselves for the role, but also stating exactly why you would make a perfect match for the business.
If you’ve done their homework correctly, you’ll have a blueprint in exactly what the company’s values are. You’ll then use your own skills, accomplishments and personality and tie them in with everything you’ve learned to hack together the perfect response.

Good answer: ‘Based on the research I’ve done about your company, you’re an organisation that really values staying on the cutting edge of technology. I was especially impressed with some of the technical details I read about the XYZ project. I think there’s a really good fit between my interest in evolving my own skills and technical knowledge, and the fact that your firm is known for continual technical improvements. That’s one reason I’m really excited to have the opportunity to work here’

Bad answer: ‘You have a job. I need a job. Put your hands together, and everyone’s a winner’

Which websites do you use personally? Why?
The secret to answering this one directly relates to the role that is being advertised.
If recruiters are looking to fill a traditional role in a less tech-savvy kind of business, they may use this question as the perfect opportunity to see how you keep abreast of the latest industry trends, or what you’re passionate about outside of the office.

However, recruiters may even oblige if you wish to show off your techie credentials. It could be a rundown of apps on your iPhone home screen, your preferred blogging platform, or which forums you frequent to keep your coding knowledge up-to-date.

Think of it as another chance to show what really motivates you.

Good answer: ‘I probably check websites like TechCrunch and Mashable about once a day. They’re a great source of news about a wide range of industries, and definitely help me keep-up with any particular tech-heavy chats around the coffee machine.’

Bad answer: ‘I’m a pretty big fan of Facebook. By the way, did you get my friend request?’

If you were offered the job, what’s the first thing you’d change?
Ah, finally a loaded question…

If recruiters specifically want someone to do a turnaround job, or if they have given you the sense that the role is focussed on making changes, then you may be asked to highlight some specific areas for improvement. This will allow you to highlight the impact you will bring to the company if you are hired.

However, the real skill here lies in answering without completely disregarding the experience and opinions of your prospective team. Recruiters are looking for people who tactfully try and get their point across. They are not looking for bullies.

A good answer should stress consultation and the need for information gathering, rather than recommending wholesale changes. Words like evolve, add, contribute and develop can be more effective than change, transform, overhaul or fix.

And with this question, more than any other, less is more. Because no-one wants to hire a know-it-all…

Good answer: ‘I can see from the job description that part of this role will involve helping to manage the company’s social media channels. I noticed in my research that you don’t post very often, and the tone seems a little inconsistent. I’d be looking to help develop a more reliable voice and personality for the brand, to help set us apart from the competition.’

Bad answer: ‘Where do I start?/I’m glad you asked. I’ve bought along a thirty-seven slide PowerPoint presentation detailing each change. Can someone dim the lights?’

Written with information sourced from Reed Recruitment. Visit reed.co.uk to find jobs in the UK

 

Five competency interview questions you should be prepared to answer

Competency questions have become a popular part of interviewing. Most recruiters often begin a question with “tell me about a time”, or “give an example of how”, these forms of questions have become integral in the interviewing process.
In the past, candidates were usually asked to speculate what they would do in certain situations. However, today candidates are asked to provide specific examples of situations that have actually occurred, and use real-world examples to illustrate their own characteristics.
To help you prepare some of these types of questions. Here are five competency questions which you should be prepared to answer at an interview.
Tell me about a time you supported a member of your team who was struggling
Whilst it may seem like a pretty straightforward competency-based question, there is actually one big consideration for you to think about when selecting your own story, one which goes far beyond the typical STAR method of answering.

After all, while many companies rightly value teamwork and empathy in their staff, the cold, hard truth is that helping and caring still has to be seen to benefit to their bottom line.
The best interviewees answer this question by not only stressing how they may have supported a colleague in crisis, but also how their support translated into higher performance for the company.

Nice people are great. But it’s what you will bring to the business that really counts.

Good answer: ‘My job comes with a fair amount of analysis on a day-to-day basis, which means I’m pretty confident using software like Excel. One of my newer colleagues didn’t have much experience and was having a tough time with their reporting, so I offered to help out a few days after work to get him up to speed. Since then, he’s never had a problem with reporting, and I’ve never had a problem getting a drink if he’s at the bar.’

Bad answer: ‘Team? If I’m honest, I like to think of myself as more of a one man wolf pack…’

Give an example of a time you’ve had to improvise to achieve your goal
Translation: Can you think on your feet?

Think of this question as a kind of horrible hybrid between a curveball, and a classic competency question. Recruiters like this question because it takes candidates out of their comfort zones to see how they cope under pressure, whilst simultaneously asking for real-life experience to back-up what they say.

Recruiters will be paying keen attention to your answer, since every answer has the potential to reveal something new about your personality. Improvisation is all about facing the chaos. If you can handle the unexpected and overcome fear of failure to come out swinging, the way you answer almost becomes as important as the answer itself.

Well, almost..

Good answer: ‘My previous company often hosted client conferences, which were an important revenue driver for the business. For each event we booked an MC to introduce speakers and keep things entertaining. At a conference last year, to my horror, our scheduled MC came down with food poisoning the night before the event. We were too close to the event to find a replacement, so as the event manager, it fell to me to fill in. I was incredibly nervous, but after a lot of deep breaths and a little practice backstage, and I got through it. I had some great feedback, and my presenting skills even improved as a result, which was a bonus.

Bad answer: ‘I improvised a lot on my CV to get this interview…’

Why are you a good fit for the company?
Let’s face it: everyone wants to be wanted.
And, whether we like to admit it or not, recruiters are no different. Recruiters are under no illusion in thinking that their interview is the only one that you may have, however people who are simply playing the field and seeing what’s out there are always less likely to impress
The way a great candidate stands out when answering this question is by not just selling themselves for the role, but also stating exactly why you would make a perfect match for the business.
If you’ve done their homework correctly, you’ll have a blueprint in exactly what the company’s values are. You’ll then use your own skills, accomplishments and personality and tie them in with everything you’ve learned to hack together the perfect response.

Good answer: ‘Based on the research I’ve done about your company, you’re an organisation that really values staying on the cutting edge of technology. I was especially impressed with some of the technical details I read about the XYZ project. I think there’s a really good fit between my interest in evolving my own skills and technical knowledge, and the fact that your firm is known for continual technical improvements. That’s one reason I’m really excited to have the opportunity to work here’

Bad answer: ‘You have a job. I need a job. Put your hands together, and everyone’s a winner’

Which websites do you use personally? Why?
The secret to answering this one directly relates to the role that is being advertised.
If recruiters are looking to fill a traditional role in a less tech-savvy kind of business, they may use this question as the perfect opportunity to see how you keep abreast of the latest industry trends, or what you’re passionate about outside of the office.

However, recruiters may even oblige if you wish to show off your techie credentials. It could be a rundown of apps on your iPhone home screen, your preferred blogging platform, or which forums you frequent to keep your coding knowledge up-to-date.

Think of it as another chance to show what really motivates you.

Good answer: ‘I probably check websites like TechCrunch and Mashable about once a day. They’re a great source of news about a wide range of industries, and definitely help me keep-up with any particular tech-heavy chats around the coffee machine.’

Bad answer: ‘I’m a pretty big fan of Facebook. By the way, did you get my friend request?’

If you were offered the job, what’s the first thing you’d change?
Ah, finally a loaded question…

If recruiters specifically want someone to do a turnaround job, or if they have given you the sense that the role is focussed on making changes, then you may be asked to highlight some specific areas for improvement. This will allow you to highlight the impact you will bring to the company if you are hired.

However, the real skill here lies in answering without completely disregarding the experience and opinions of your prospective team. Recruiters are looking for people who tactfully try and get their point across. They are not looking for bullies.

A good answer should stress consultation and the need for information gathering, rather than recommending wholesale changes. Words like evolve, add, contribute and develop can be more effective than change, transform, overhaul or fix.

And with this question, more than any other, less is more. Because no-one wants to hire a know-it-all…

Good answer: ‘I can see from the job description that part of this role will involve helping to manage the company’s social media channels. I noticed in my research that you don’t post very often, and the tone seems a little inconsistent. I’d be looking to help develop a more reliable voice and personality for the brand, to help set us apart from the competition.’

Bad answer: ‘Where do I start?/I’m glad you asked. I’ve bought along a thirty-seven slide PowerPoint presentation detailing each change. Can someone dim the lights?’

Written with information sourced from Reed Recruitment. Visit reed.co.uk to find jobs in the UK

 

Five competency interview questions you should be prepared to answer

Competency questions have become a popular part of interviewing. Most recruiters often begin a question with “tell me about a time”, or “give an example of how”, these forms of questions have become integral in the interviewing process.
In the past, candidates were usually asked to speculate what they would do in certain situations. However, today candidates are asked to provide specific examples of situations that have actually occurred, and use real-world examples to illustrate their own characteristics.
To help you prepare some of these types of questions. Here are five competency questions which you should be prepared to answer at an interview.
Tell me about a time you supported a member of your team who was struggling
Whilst it may seem like a pretty straightforward competency-based question, there is actually one big consideration for you to think about when selecting your own story, one which goes far beyond the typical STAR method of answering.

After all, while many companies rightly value teamwork and empathy in their staff, the cold, hard truth is that helping and caring still has to be seen to benefit to their bottom line.
The best interviewees answer this question by not only stressing how they may have supported a colleague in crisis, but also how their support translated into higher performance for the company.

Nice people are great. But it’s what you will bring to the business that really counts.

Good answer: ‘My job comes with a fair amount of analysis on a day-to-day basis, which means I’m pretty confident using software like Excel. One of my newer colleagues didn’t have much experience and was having a tough time with their reporting, so I offered to help out a few days after work to get him up to speed. Since then, he’s never had a problem with reporting, and I’ve never had a problem getting a drink if he’s at the bar.’

Bad answer: ‘Team? If I’m honest, I like to think of myself as more of a one man wolf pack…’

Give an example of a time you’ve had to improvise to achieve your goal
Translation: Can you think on your feet?

Think of this question as a kind of horrible hybrid between a curveball, and a classic competency question. Recruiters like this question because it takes candidates out of their comfort zones to see how they cope under pressure, whilst simultaneously asking for real-life experience to back-up what they say.

Recruiters will be paying keen attention to your answer, since every answer has the potential to reveal something new about your personality. Improvisation is all about facing the chaos. If you can handle the unexpected and overcome fear of failure to come out swinging, the way you answer almost becomes as important as the answer itself.

Well, almost..

Good answer: ‘My previous company often hosted client conferences, which were an important revenue driver for the business. For each event we booked an MC to introduce speakers and keep things entertaining. At a conference last year, to my horror, our scheduled MC came down with food poisoning the night before the event. We were too close to the event to find a replacement, so as the event manager, it fell to me to fill in. I was incredibly nervous, but after a lot of deep breaths and a little practice backstage, and I got through it. I had some great feedback, and my presenting skills even improved as a result, which was a bonus.

Bad answer: ‘I improvised a lot on my CV to get this interview…’

Why are you a good fit for the company?
Let’s face it: everyone wants to be wanted.
And, whether we like to admit it or not, recruiters are no different. Recruiters are under no illusion in thinking that their interview is the only one that you may have, however people who are simply playing the field and seeing what’s out there are always less likely to impress
The way a great candidate stands out when answering this question is by not just selling themselves for the role, but also stating exactly why you would make a perfect match for the business.
If you’ve done their homework correctly, you’ll have a blueprint in exactly what the company’s values are. You’ll then use your own skills, accomplishments and personality and tie them in with everything you’ve learned to hack together the perfect response.

Good answer: ‘Based on the research I’ve done about your company, you’re an organisation that really values staying on the cutting edge of technology. I was especially impressed with some of the technical details I read about the XYZ project. I think there’s a really good fit between my interest in evolving my own skills and technical knowledge, and the fact that your firm is known for continual technical improvements. That’s one reason I’m really excited to have the opportunity to work here’

Bad answer: ‘You have a job. I need a job. Put your hands together, and everyone’s a winner’

Which websites do you use personally? Why?
The secret to answering this one directly relates to the role that is being advertised.
If recruiters are looking to fill a traditional role in a less tech-savvy kind of business, they may use this question as the perfect opportunity to see how you keep abreast of the latest industry trends, or what you’re passionate about outside of the office.

However, recruiters may even oblige if you wish to show off your techie credentials. It could be a rundown of apps on your iPhone home screen, your preferred blogging platform, or which forums you frequent to keep your coding knowledge up-to-date.

Think of it as another chance to show what really motivates you.

Good answer: ‘I probably check websites like TechCrunch and Mashable about once a day. They’re a great source of news about a wide range of industries, and definitely help me keep-up with any particular tech-heavy chats around the coffee machine.’

Bad answer: ‘I’m a pretty big fan of Facebook. By the way, did you get my friend request?’

If you were offered the job, what’s the first thing you’d change?
Ah, finally a loaded question…

If recruiters specifically want someone to do a turnaround job, or if they have given you the sense that the role is focussed on making changes, then you may be asked to highlight some specific areas for improvement. This will allow you to highlight the impact you will bring to the company if you are hired.

However, the real skill here lies in answering without completely disregarding the experience and opinions of your prospective team. Recruiters are looking for people who tactfully try and get their point across. They are not looking for bullies.

A good answer should stress consultation and the need for information gathering, rather than recommending wholesale changes. Words like evolve, add, contribute and develop can be more effective than change, transform, overhaul or fix.

And with this question, more than any other, less is more. Because no-one wants to hire a know-it-all…

Good answer: ‘I can see from the job description that part of this role will involve helping to manage the company’s social media channels. I noticed in my research that you don’t post very often, and the tone seems a little inconsistent. I’d be looking to help develop a more reliable voice and personality for the brand, to help set us apart from the competition.’

Bad answer: ‘Where do I start?/I’m glad you asked. I’ve bought along a thirty-seven slide PowerPoint presentation detailing each change. Can someone dim the lights?’

Written with information sourced from Reed Recruitment. Visit reed.co.uk to find jobs in the UK

Free Museums in London

 

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

Samuel Johnson famously said, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.” London is by far one of the most exciting cities in the world. Here at the Burlington School, we plan a variety of activities for our students to ensure they have a fun filled learning experience. However, students are encouraged to go out on their own and find activities that may interest them. Museums are often the best place to start. Therefore, we have put together a list of free museums which we think every student should visit while studying in London.

Bank of England Museum
Housed within the impressive walls of the Bank of England, this fascinating museum takes you through the history of the bank since its foundation in 1694 to its role today as the nation’s central bank.
There are gold bars dating from ancient times to the modern market bar, coins and a unique collection of banknotes. There are also many items you might not expect to find, such as the pikes and muskets used to defend the bank; the Roman pottery and mosaics uncovered when it was rebuilt in 1930; and documents relating to famous customers such as Horatio Nelson, George Washington and the Duchess of Marlborough.

The British Postal Museum & Archive
The leading resource for British postal history. Split between two sites.
The Royal Mail archive in Central London houses stamps, posters, post office records and design artwork, accessed via a public search room including a small exhibition space, 10 minutes walk from Farringdon Tube station.

The Museum Store in Debden, Essex, includes Rowland Hill’s desk, an extensive collection of pillar boxes, post office vans, telephone boxes and more, five minutes walk from Debden Tube station on the Central line.
Free guided tours of both the Archive and the Museum Store are available. Open on selected days throughout the year – see: www.postalheritage.org.uk for details.
IWM London: Imperial War Museum London

IWM London tells the story of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Discover our new First World War Galleries as well as our permanent exhibitions including The Lord Ashcroft Gallery: Extraordinary Heroes and Secret War. Explore stories and key moments from the Second World War in A Family in Wartime and The Holocaust Exhibition.

Museum of London
Step inside the Museum of London for an unforgettable journey through the capital’s turbulent past. Discover prehistoric London, see how the city changed under Romans and Saxons, wonder at medieval London and examine the tumultuous years when London was ravaged by civil wars, plague and fire.
Then venture into the Galleries of Modern London where you can walk the streets of Victorian London, take a stroll in recreated pleasure gardens and marvel at the magnificent Lord Mayor’s Coach.
From 9 October 2015, never-before-seen-objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on display in a major new exhibition. Find out more at museumoflondon.org.uk/crimemuseum.

Museum of London Docklands
Step inside a 200-year-old warehouse revealing the long history of London as a port through stories of trade, migration and commerce.
Discover a wealth of objects in modern galleries, including Sailortown, an atmospheric recreation of 19th-century London; and London, Sugar & Slavery, which reveals the city’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade. With ancient finds, unusual objects and fascinating tours, the Museum of London Docklands is one of London’s hidden treasures.
From 19 June, explore a major free photography exhibition, Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom.

National Gallery
The National Gallery displays over 2,000 Western European paintings from the middle ages to the 20th century. Discover inspiring art by Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Turner, Renoir and Van Gogh. The pictures in the collection belong to the public and admission to see them is free. There are special exhibitions, lectures, video and audio-visual programmes, guided tours and holiday events for children and adults.

National Maritime Museum Greenwich
Discover stories about Britain’s encounter with the world at sea through our galleries that recall the romance of the great ocean liners, the history of trade across the Atlantic and the impact of the East India Company on British culture and more. See Nelson’s uniform from the Battle of Trafalgar and Prince Frederick’s beautiful gilded barge.
Children can shoot down a dastardly pirate ship in a new interactive game; older kids will enjoy our ship simulator.
We host free and ticketed events, from lectures by our curators, music nights to seasonal family celebrations.
On site eateries include Paul bakery, our Museum Café and our elegant 16 Seconds West Brasserie.

National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery houses the world’s largest collection of personalities and faces, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Visitors come face-to-face with the people who have shaped British history, from kings and queens to musicians and film stars. Artists featured range from Holbein to Hockney, and the collection includes work across all media, from painting and sculpture to photography and video.
As well as the permanent displays, the National Portrait Gallery has a diverse programme of exhibitions and free events, and a stunning rooftop restaurant with spectacular views across the London skyline.

Natural History Museum
Hundreds of exciting, interactive exhibits in one of London’s most beautiful landmark buildings. Highlights include the popular Dinosaurs gallery, Mammals display with the unforgettable model blue whale and the spectacular Central Hall, home to the Museum’s iconic Diplodocus skeleton.
Don’t miss the state-of-the-art Darwin Centre Cocoon where, on a self-guided tour, you can see hundreds of fascinating specimens and look into laboratories where scientists are at work.
The Museum offers a wide-ranging programme of temporary exhibitions and events, including chances to join experts in the Darwin Centre’s high-tech Attenborough Studio in topical discussions about science and nature.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

Royal Air Force Museum London
If you’re searching for something different, why not take off to the Royal Air Force Museum in Colindale and navigate your way through the history of aviation from the earliest balloon flight to the latest Eurofighter?
This world-class collection of more than 100 aircraft, aviation and wartime memorabilia offers a fun day out for all the family.
Don’t forget to visit the 3D cinema in Milestones of Flight, an awe-inspiring sound and light show that takes you back in time to the Battle of Britain; or the interactive gallery for children, Aeronauts, which contains a variety of games that teach them about flight. Open from 10:00 to 18:00 daily, offering free admission and ample parking.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

The Wallace Collection
A free national museum displaying superb works of art in an historic London town house. The collection was acquired principally in the 19th century by the 3rd and 4th Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess. The 28 rooms, many recently refurbished with elaborate gilding & wall silks, present collections of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain (many once owned by Madame de Pompadour and Queen Marie-Antoinette) together with paintings by Titian, Canaletto, Rembrandt and Gainsborough, Hals’ ‘The Laughing Cavalier’ and Fragonard’s ‘The Swing’, four armouries and wonderful Renaissance treasures. Dine in the beautiful glazed courtyard restuarant.

Victoria and Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum is the world’s greatest museum of art and design, representing more than 3,000 years of human creativity, with collections unrivalled in their scope and diversity.
In recent years, the V&A has undergone a dramatic programme of renewal and restoration. Highlights include the Medieval Renaissance galleries containing some of the greatest surviving treasures from the period, the breathtaking Jewellery gallery and the stunning British Galleries, illustrating the history of Britain through the nation’s art and design. In addition to its outstanding free permanent collection, the V&A offers a programme of temporary exhibitions and an extensive events programme.

Tate Modern
A visit to London isn’t complete without a trip to Tate Modern.
Britain’s national museum of modern and contemporary art from around the world is housed in the former Bankside Power Station on the banks of the Thames. The awe-inspiring Turbine Hall runs the length of the entire building and you can see amazing work for free by artists such as Cézanne, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Rothko, Dalí, Pollock, Warhol and Bourgeois.

Tate Britain
London’s Tate Britain holds the largest collection of British art in the world from 1500 to the present day. You’ll find masterpieces by Gainsborough, Hogarth, Millais, Whistler, as well as outstanding modern and contemporary artists such as Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst. We also have the largest collection of works by JMW Turner in the world.

V&A Museum of Childhood
The V&A Museum of Childhood houses the UK’s national collection of childhood objects, ranging in date from the 1600s to the present day.
As well as toys, dolls and games, the museum has a wealth of objects relating to aspects of childhood including home, childcare, play, learning and clothing.
Rare, hand-crafted objects sit alongside well-loved toys from the 20th century, allowing an insight into how different children might have lived, thought and felt, through the objects they were surrounded by throughout their childhood.
In addition, the museum runs temporary exhibitions and displays, activities, events and workshops, outreach projects and an award-winning programme for schools.

Museum information provided by Visit London

 

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

Samuel Johnson famously said, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.” London is by far one of the most exciting cities in the world. Here at Burlington School, we plan a variety of activities taking students all across London which creates a fun filled learning environment. However, students are encouraged to often go out on their own and find activities that may interest them. As a part of your learning experience, museums are often the best place to start. Therefore, we have put together a list of free museums which we think every student should visit while studying in London.

Bank of England Museum
Housed within the impressive walls of the Bank of England, this fascinating museum takes you through the history of the bank since its foundation in 1694 to its role today as the nation’s central bank.
There are gold bars dating from ancient times to the modern market bar, coins and a unique collection of banknotes. There are also many items you might not expect to find, such as the pikes and muskets used to defend the bank; the Roman pottery and mosaics uncovered when it was rebuilt in 1930; and documents relating to famous customers such as Horatio Nelson, George Washington and the Duchess of Marlborough.

The British Postal Museum & Archive
The leading resource for British postal history. Split between two sites.
The Royal Mail archive in Central London houses stamps, posters, post office records and design artwork, accessed via a public search room including a small exhibition space, 10 minutes walk from Farringdon Tube station.

The Museum Store in Debden, Essex, includes Rowland Hill’s desk, an extensive collection of pillar boxes, post office vans, telephone boxes and more, five minutes walk from Debden Tube station on the Central line.
Free guided tours of both the Archive and the Museum Store are available. Open on selected days throughout the year – see: www.postalheritage.org.uk for details.

IWM London: Imperial War Museum London
IWM London tells the story of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Discover our new First World War Galleries as well as our permanent exhibitions including The Lord Ashcroft Gallery: Extraordinary Heroes and Secret War. Explore stories and key moments from the Second World War in A Family in Wartime and The Holocaust Exhibition.

Museum of London
Step inside the Museum of London for an unforgettable journey through the capital’s turbulent past. Discover prehistoric London, see how the city changed under Romans and Saxons, wonder at medieval London and examine the tumultuous years when London was ravaged by civil wars, plague and fire.
Then venture into the Galleries of Modern London where you can walk the streets of Victorian London, take a stroll in recreated pleasure gardens and marvel at the magnificent Lord Mayor’s Coach.
From 9 October 2015, never-before-seen-objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on display in a major new exhibition. Find out more at museumoflondon.org.uk/crimemuseum.

Museum of London Docklands
Step inside a 200-year-old warehouse revealing the long history of London as a port through stories of trade, migration and commerce.
Discover a wealth of objects in modern galleries, including Sailortown, an atmospheric recreation of 19th-century London; and London, Sugar & Slavery, which reveals the city’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade. With ancient finds, unusual objects and fascinating tours, the Museum of London Docklands is one of London’s hidden treasures.
From 19 June, explore a major free photography exhibition, Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom.

National Gallery
The National Gallery displays over 2,000 Western European paintings from the middle ages to the 20th century. Discover inspiring art by Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Turner, Renoir and Van Gogh. The pictures in the collection belong to the public and admission to see them is free. There are special exhibitions, lectures, video and audio-visual programmes, guided tours and holiday events for children and adults.

National Maritime Museum Greenwich
Discover stories about Britain’s encounter with the world at sea through our galleries that recall the romance of the great ocean liners, the history of trade across the Atlantic and the impact of the East India Company on British culture and more. See Nelson’s uniform from the Battle of Trafalgar and Prince Frederick’s beautiful gilded barge.
Children can shoot down a dastardly pirate ship in a new interactive game; older kids will enjoy our ship simulator.
We host free and ticketed events, from lectures by our curators, music nights to seasonal family celebrations.
On site eateries include Paul bakery, our Museum Café and our elegant 16 Seconds West Brasserie.

National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery houses the world’s largest collection of personalities and faces, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Visitors come face-to-face with the people who have shaped British history, from kings and queens to musicians and film stars. Artists featured range from Holbein to Hockney, and the collection includes work across all media, from painting and sculpture to photography and video.
As well as the permanent displays, the National Portrait Gallery has a diverse programme of exhibitions and free events, and a stunning rooftop restaurant with spectacular views across the London skyline.

Natural History Museum
Hundreds of exciting, interactive exhibits in one of London’s most beautiful landmark buildings. Highlights include the popular Dinosaurs gallery, Mammals display with the unforgettable model blue whale and the spectacular Central Hall, home to the Museum’s iconic Diplodocus skeleton.
Don’t miss the state-of-the-art Darwin Centre Cocoon where, on a self-guided tour, you can see hundreds of fascinating specimens and look into laboratories where scientists are at work.
The Museum offers a wide-ranging programme of temporary exhibitions and events, including chances to join experts in the Darwin Centre’s high-tech Attenborough Studio in topical discussions about science and nature.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

Royal Air Force Museum London
If you’re searching for something different, why not take off to the Royal Air Force Museum in Colindale and navigate your way through the history of aviation from the earliest balloon flight to the latest Eurofighter?
This world-class collection of more than 100 aircraft, aviation and wartime memorabilia offers a fun day out for all the family.
Don’t forget to visit the 3D cinema in Milestones of Flight, an awe-inspiring sound and light show that takes you back in time to the Battle of Britain; or the interactive gallery for children, Aeronauts, which contains a variety of games that teach them about flight. Open from 10:00 to 18:00 daily, offering free admission and ample parking.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

The Wallace Collection
A free national museum displaying superb works of art in an historic London town house. The collection was acquired principally in the 19th century by the 3rd and 4th Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess. The 28 rooms, many recently refurbished with elaborate gilding & wall silks, present collections of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain (many once owned by Madame de Pompadour and Queen Marie-Antoinette) together with paintings by Titian, Canaletto, Rembrandt and Gainsborough, Hals’ ‘The Laughing Cavalier’ and Fragonard’s ‘The Swing’, four armouries and wonderful Renaissance treasures. Dine in the beautiful glazed courtyard restuarant.

Victoria and Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum is the world’s greatest museum of art and design, representing more than 3,000 years of human creativity, with collections unrivalled in their scope and diversity.
In recent years, the V&A has undergone a dramatic programme of renewal and restoration. Highlights include the Medieval Renaissance galleries containing some of the greatest surviving treasures from the period, the breathtaking Jewellery gallery and the stunning British Galleries, illustrating the history of Britain through the nation’s art and design. In addition to its outstanding free permanent collection, the V&A offers a programme of temporary exhibitions and an extensive events programme.

Tate Modern
A visit to London isn’t complete without a trip to Tate Modern.
Britain’s national museum of modern and contemporary art from around the world is housed in the former Bankside Power Station on the banks of the Thames. The awe-inspiring Turbine Hall runs the length of the entire building and you can see amazing work for free by artists such as Cézanne, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Rothko, Dalí, Pollock, Warhol and Bourgeois.

Tate Britain
London’s Tate Britain holds the largest collection of British art in the world from 1500 to the present day. You’ll find masterpieces by Gainsborough, Hogarth, Millais, Whistler, as well as outstanding modern and contemporary artists such as Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst. We also have the largest collection of works by JMW Turner in the world.

V&A Museum of Childhood
The V&A Museum of Childhood houses the UK’s national collection of childhood objects, ranging in date from the 1600s to the present day.
As well as toys, dolls and games, the museum has a wealth of objects relating to aspects of childhood including home, childcare, play, learning and clothing.
Rare, hand-crafted objects sit alongside well-loved toys from the 20th century, allowing an insight into how different children might have lived, thought and felt, through the objects they were surrounded by throughout their childhood.
In addition, the museum runs temporary exhibitions and displays, activities, events and workshops, outreach projects and an award-winning programme for schools.

Museum information provided by Visit London

 

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

Samuel Johnson famously said, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.” London is by far one of the most exciting cities in the world. Here at Burlington School, we plan a variety of activities taking students all across London which creates a fun filled learning environment. However, students are encouraged to often go out on their own and find activities that may interest them. As a part of your learning experience, museums are often the best place to start. Therefore, we have put together a list of free museums which we think every student should visit while studying in London.

Bank of England Museum
Housed within the impressive walls of the Bank of England, this fascinating museum takes you through the history of the bank since its foundation in 1694 to its role today as the nation’s central bank.
There are gold bars dating from ancient times to the modern market bar, coins and a unique collection of banknotes. There are also many items you might not expect to find, such as the pikes and muskets used to defend the bank; the Roman pottery and mosaics uncovered when it was rebuilt in 1930; and documents relating to famous customers such as Horatio Nelson, George Washington and the Duchess of Marlborough.

The British Postal Museum & Archive
The leading resource for British postal history. Split between two sites.
The Royal Mail archive in Central London houses stamps, posters, post office records and design artwork, accessed via a public search room including a small exhibition space, 10 minutes walk from Farringdon Tube station.

The Museum Store in Debden, Essex, includes Rowland Hill’s desk, an extensive collection of pillar boxes, post office vans, telephone boxes and more, five minutes walk from Debden Tube station on the Central line.
Free guided tours of both the Archive and the Museum Store are available. Open on selected days throughout the year – see: www.postalheritage.org.uk for details.

IWM London: Imperial War Museum London
IWM London tells the story of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Discover our new First World War Galleries as well as our permanent exhibitions including The Lord Ashcroft Gallery: Extraordinary Heroes and Secret War. Explore stories and key moments from the Second World War in A Family in Wartime and The Holocaust Exhibition.

Museum of London
Step inside the Museum of London for an unforgettable journey through the capital’s turbulent past. Discover prehistoric London, see how the city changed under Romans and Saxons, wonder at medieval London and examine the tumultuous years when London was ravaged by civil wars, plague and fire.
Then venture into the Galleries of Modern London where you can walk the streets of Victorian London, take a stroll in recreated pleasure gardens and marvel at the magnificent Lord Mayor’s Coach.
From 9 October 2015, never-before-seen-objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on display in a major new exhibition. Find out more at museumoflondon.org.uk/crimemuseum.

Museum of London Docklands
Step inside a 200-year-old warehouse revealing the long history of London as a port through stories of trade, migration and commerce.
Discover a wealth of objects in modern galleries, including Sailortown, an atmospheric recreation of 19th-century London; and London, Sugar & Slavery, which reveals the city’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade. With ancient finds, unusual objects and fascinating tours, the Museum of London Docklands is one of London’s hidden treasures.
From 19 June, explore a major free photography exhibition, Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom.

National Gallery
The National Gallery displays over 2,000 Western European paintings from the middle ages to the 20th century. Discover inspiring art by Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Turner, Renoir and Van Gogh. The pictures in the collection belong to the public and admission to see them is free. There are special exhibitions, lectures, video and audio-visual programmes, guided tours and holiday events for children and adults.

National Maritime Museum Greenwich
Discover stories about Britain’s encounter with the world at sea through our galleries that recall the romance of the great ocean liners, the history of trade across the Atlantic and the impact of the East India Company on British culture and more. See Nelson’s uniform from the Battle of Trafalgar and Prince Frederick’s beautiful gilded barge.
Children can shoot down a dastardly pirate ship in a new interactive game; older kids will enjoy our ship simulator.
We host free and ticketed events, from lectures by our curators, music nights to seasonal family celebrations.
On site eateries include Paul bakery, our Museum Café and our elegant 16 Seconds West Brasserie.

National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery houses the world’s largest collection of personalities and faces, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Visitors come face-to-face with the people who have shaped British history, from kings and queens to musicians and film stars. Artists featured range from Holbein to Hockney, and the collection includes work across all media, from painting and sculpture to photography and video.
As well as the permanent displays, the National Portrait Gallery has a diverse programme of exhibitions and free events, and a stunning rooftop restaurant with spectacular views across the London skyline.

Natural History Museum
Hundreds of exciting, interactive exhibits in one of London’s most beautiful landmark buildings. Highlights include the popular Dinosaurs gallery, Mammals display with the unforgettable model blue whale and the spectacular Central Hall, home to the Museum’s iconic Diplodocus skeleton.
Don’t miss the state-of-the-art Darwin Centre Cocoon where, on a self-guided tour, you can see hundreds of fascinating specimens and look into laboratories where scientists are at work.
The Museum offers a wide-ranging programme of temporary exhibitions and events, including chances to join experts in the Darwin Centre’s high-tech Attenborough Studio in topical discussions about science and nature.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

Royal Air Force Museum London
If you’re searching for something different, why not take off to the Royal Air Force Museum in Colindale and navigate your way through the history of aviation from the earliest balloon flight to the latest Eurofighter?
This world-class collection of more than 100 aircraft, aviation and wartime memorabilia offers a fun day out for all the family.
Don’t forget to visit the 3D cinema in Milestones of Flight, an awe-inspiring sound and light show that takes you back in time to the Battle of Britain; or the interactive gallery for children, Aeronauts, which contains a variety of games that teach them about flight. Open from 10:00 to 18:00 daily, offering free admission and ample parking.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

The Wallace Collection
A free national museum displaying superb works of art in an historic London town house. The collection was acquired principally in the 19th century by the 3rd and 4th Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess. The 28 rooms, many recently refurbished with elaborate gilding & wall silks, present collections of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain (many once owned by Madame de Pompadour and Queen Marie-Antoinette) together with paintings by Titian, Canaletto, Rembrandt and Gainsborough, Hals’ ‘The Laughing Cavalier’ and Fragonard’s ‘The Swing’, four armouries and wonderful Renaissance treasures. Dine in the beautiful glazed courtyard restuarant.

Victoria and Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum is the world’s greatest museum of art and design, representing more than 3,000 years of human creativity, with collections unrivalled in their scope and diversity.
In recent years, the V&A has undergone a dramatic programme of renewal and restoration. Highlights include the Medieval Renaissance galleries containing some of the greatest surviving treasures from the period, the breathtaking Jewellery gallery and the stunning British Galleries, illustrating the history of Britain through the nation’s art and design. In addition to its outstanding free permanent collection, the V&A offers a programme of temporary exhibitions and an extensive events programme.

Tate Modern
A visit to London isn’t complete without a trip to Tate Modern.
Britain’s national museum of modern and contemporary art from around the world is housed in the former Bankside Power Station on the banks of the Thames. The awe-inspiring Turbine Hall runs the length of the entire building and you can see amazing work for free by artists such as Cézanne, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Rothko, Dalí, Pollock, Warhol and Bourgeois.

Tate Britain
London’s Tate Britain holds the largest collection of British art in the world from 1500 to the present day. You’ll find masterpieces by Gainsborough, Hogarth, Millais, Whistler, as well as outstanding modern and contemporary artists such as Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst. We also have the largest collection of works by JMW Turner in the world.

V&A Museum of Childhood
The V&A Museum of Childhood houses the UK’s national collection of childhood objects, ranging in date from the 1600s to the present day.
As well as toys, dolls and games, the museum has a wealth of objects relating to aspects of childhood including home, childcare, play, learning and clothing.
Rare, hand-crafted objects sit alongside well-loved toys from the 20th century, allowing an insight into how different children might have lived, thought and felt, through the objects they were surrounded by throughout their childhood.
In addition, the museum runs temporary exhibitions and displays, activities, events and workshops, outreach projects and an award-winning programme for schools.

Museum information provided by Visit London

 

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

Samuel Johnson famously said, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.” London is by far one of the most exciting cities in the world. Here at Burlington School, we plan a variety of activities taking students all across London which creates a fun filled learning environment. However, students are encouraged to often go out on their own and find activities that may interest them. As a part of your learning experience, museums are often the best place to start. Therefore, we have put together a list of free museums which we think every student should visit while studying in London.

Bank of England Museum
Housed within the impressive walls of the Bank of England, this fascinating museum takes you through the history of the bank since its foundation in 1694 to its role today as the nation’s central bank.
There are gold bars dating from ancient times to the modern market bar, coins and a unique collection of banknotes. There are also many items you might not expect to find, such as the pikes and muskets used to defend the bank; the Roman pottery and mosaics uncovered when it was rebuilt in 1930; and documents relating to famous customers such as Horatio Nelson, George Washington and the Duchess of Marlborough.

The British Postal Museum & Archive
The leading resource for British postal history. Split between two sites.
The Royal Mail archive in Central London houses stamps, posters, post office records and design artwork, accessed via a public search room including a small exhibition space, 10 minutes walk from Farringdon Tube station.

The Museum Store in Debden, Essex, includes Rowland Hill’s desk, an extensive collection of pillar boxes, post office vans, telephone boxes and more, five minutes walk from Debden Tube station on the Central line.
Free guided tours of both the Archive and the Museum Store are available. Open on selected days throughout the year – see: www.postalheritage.org.uk for details.

IWM London: Imperial War Museum London
IWM London tells the story of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Discover our new First World War Galleries as well as our permanent exhibitions including The Lord Ashcroft Gallery: Extraordinary Heroes and Secret War. Explore stories and key moments from the Second World War in A Family in Wartime and The Holocaust Exhibition.

Museum of London
Step inside the Museum of London for an unforgettable journey through the capital’s turbulent past. Discover prehistoric London, see how the city changed under Romans and Saxons, wonder at medieval London and examine the tumultuous years when London was ravaged by civil wars, plague and fire.
Then venture into the Galleries of Modern London where you can walk the streets of Victorian London, take a stroll in recreated pleasure gardens and marvel at the magnificent Lord Mayor’s Coach.
From 9 October 2015, never-before-seen-objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on display in a major new exhibition. Find out more at museumoflondon.org.uk/crimemuseum.

Museum of London Docklands
Step inside a 200-year-old warehouse revealing the long history of London as a port through stories of trade, migration and commerce.
Discover a wealth of objects in modern galleries, including Sailortown, an atmospheric recreation of 19th-century London; and London, Sugar & Slavery, which reveals the city’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade. With ancient finds, unusual objects and fascinating tours, the Museum of London Docklands is one of London’s hidden treasures.
From 19 June, explore a major free photography exhibition, Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom.

National Gallery
The National Gallery displays over 2,000 Western European paintings from the middle ages to the 20th century. Discover inspiring art by Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Turner, Renoir and Van Gogh. The pictures in the collection belong to the public and admission to see them is free. There are special exhibitions, lectures, video and audio-visual programmes, guided tours and holiday events for children and adults.

National Maritime Museum Greenwich
Discover stories about Britain’s encounter with the world at sea through our galleries that recall the romance of the great ocean liners, the history of trade across the Atlantic and the impact of the East India Company on British culture and more. See Nelson’s uniform from the Battle of Trafalgar and Prince Frederick’s beautiful gilded barge.
Children can shoot down a dastardly pirate ship in a new interactive game; older kids will enjoy our ship simulator.
We host free and ticketed events, from lectures by our curators, music nights to seasonal family celebrations.
On site eateries include Paul bakery, our Museum Café and our elegant 16 Seconds West Brasserie.

National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery houses the world’s largest collection of personalities and faces, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Visitors come face-to-face with the people who have shaped British history, from kings and queens to musicians and film stars. Artists featured range from Holbein to Hockney, and the collection includes work across all media, from painting and sculpture to photography and video.
As well as the permanent displays, the National Portrait Gallery has a diverse programme of exhibitions and free events, and a stunning rooftop restaurant with spectacular views across the London skyline.

Natural History Museum
Hundreds of exciting, interactive exhibits in one of London’s most beautiful landmark buildings. Highlights include the popular Dinosaurs gallery, Mammals display with the unforgettable model blue whale and the spectacular Central Hall, home to the Museum’s iconic Diplodocus skeleton.
Don’t miss the state-of-the-art Darwin Centre Cocoon where, on a self-guided tour, you can see hundreds of fascinating specimens and look into laboratories where scientists are at work.
The Museum offers a wide-ranging programme of temporary exhibitions and events, including chances to join experts in the Darwin Centre’s high-tech Attenborough Studio in topical discussions about science and nature.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

Royal Air Force Museum London
If you’re searching for something different, why not take off to the Royal Air Force Museum in Colindale and navigate your way through the history of aviation from the earliest balloon flight to the latest Eurofighter?
This world-class collection of more than 100 aircraft, aviation and wartime memorabilia offers a fun day out for all the family.
Don’t forget to visit the 3D cinema in Milestones of Flight, an awe-inspiring sound and light show that takes you back in time to the Battle of Britain; or the interactive gallery for children, Aeronauts, which contains a variety of games that teach them about flight. Open from 10:00 to 18:00 daily, offering free admission and ample parking.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

The Wallace Collection
A free national museum displaying superb works of art in an historic London town house. The collection was acquired principally in the 19th century by the 3rd and 4th Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess. The 28 rooms, many recently refurbished with elaborate gilding & wall silks, present collections of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain (many once owned by Madame de Pompadour and Queen Marie-Antoinette) together with paintings by Titian, Canaletto, Rembrandt and Gainsborough, Hals’ ‘The Laughing Cavalier’ and Fragonard’s ‘The Swing’, four armouries and wonderful Renaissance treasures. Dine in the beautiful glazed courtyard restuarant.

Victoria and Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum is the world’s greatest museum of art and design, representing more than 3,000 years of human creativity, with collections unrivalled in their scope and diversity.
In recent years, the V&A has undergone a dramatic programme of renewal and restoration. Highlights include the Medieval Renaissance galleries containing some of the greatest surviving treasures from the period, the breathtaking Jewellery gallery and the stunning British Galleries, illustrating the history of Britain through the nation’s art and design. In addition to its outstanding free permanent collection, the V&A offers a programme of temporary exhibitions and an extensive events programme.

Tate Modern
A visit to London isn’t complete without a trip to Tate Modern.
Britain’s national museum of modern and contemporary art from around the world is housed in the former Bankside Power Station on the banks of the Thames. The awe-inspiring Turbine Hall runs the length of the entire building and you can see amazing work for free by artists such as Cézanne, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Rothko, Dalí, Pollock, Warhol and Bourgeois.

Tate Britain
London’s Tate Britain holds the largest collection of British art in the world from 1500 to the present day. You’ll find masterpieces by Gainsborough, Hogarth, Millais, Whistler, as well as outstanding modern and contemporary artists such as Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst. We also have the largest collection of works by JMW Turner in the world.

V&A Museum of Childhood
The V&A Museum of Childhood houses the UK’s national collection of childhood objects, ranging in date from the 1600s to the present day.
As well as toys, dolls and games, the museum has a wealth of objects relating to aspects of childhood including home, childcare, play, learning and clothing.
Rare, hand-crafted objects sit alongside well-loved toys from the 20th century, allowing an insight into how different children might have lived, thought and felt, through the objects they were surrounded by throughout their childhood.
In addition, the museum runs temporary exhibitions and displays, activities, events and workshops, outreach projects and an award-winning programme for schools.

Museum information provided by Visit London

 

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

Samuel Johnson famously said, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.” London is by far one of the most exciting cities in the world. Here at Burlington School, we plan a variety of activities taking students all across London which creates a fun filled learning environment. However, students are encouraged to often go out on their own and find activities that may interest them. As a part of your learning experience, museums are often the best place to start. Therefore, we have put together a list of free museums which we think every student should visit while studying in London.

Bank of England Museum
Housed within the impressive walls of the Bank of England, this fascinating museum takes you through the history of the bank since its foundation in 1694 to its role today as the nation’s central bank.
There are gold bars dating from ancient times to the modern market bar, coins and a unique collection of banknotes. There are also many items you might not expect to find, such as the pikes and muskets used to defend the bank; the Roman pottery and mosaics uncovered when it was rebuilt in 1930; and documents relating to famous customers such as Horatio Nelson, George Washington and the Duchess of Marlborough.

The British Postal Museum & Archive
The leading resource for British postal history. Split between two sites.
The Royal Mail archive in Central London houses stamps, posters, post office records and design artwork, accessed via a public search room including a small exhibition space, 10 minutes walk from Farringdon Tube station.

The Museum Store in Debden, Essex, includes Rowland Hill’s desk, an extensive collection of pillar boxes, post office vans, telephone boxes and more, five minutes walk from Debden Tube station on the Central line.
Free guided tours of both the Archive and the Museum Store are available. Open on selected days throughout the year – see: www.postalheritage.org.uk for details.

IWM London: Imperial War Museum London
IWM London tells the story of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Discover our new First World War Galleries as well as our permanent exhibitions including The Lord Ashcroft Gallery: Extraordinary Heroes and Secret War. Explore stories and key moments from the Second World War in A Family in Wartime and The Holocaust Exhibition.

Museum of London
Step inside the Museum of London for an unforgettable journey through the capital’s turbulent past. Discover prehistoric London, see how the city changed under Romans and Saxons, wonder at medieval London and examine the tumultuous years when London was ravaged by civil wars, plague and fire.
Then venture into the Galleries of Modern London where you can walk the streets of Victorian London, take a stroll in recreated pleasure gardens and marvel at the magnificent Lord Mayor’s Coach.
From 9 October 2015, never-before-seen-objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on display in a major new exhibition. Find out more at museumoflondon.org.uk/crimemuseum.

Museum of London Docklands
Step inside a 200-year-old warehouse revealing the long history of London as a port through stories of trade, migration and commerce.
Discover a wealth of objects in modern galleries, including Sailortown, an atmospheric recreation of 19th-century London; and London, Sugar & Slavery, which reveals the city’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade. With ancient finds, unusual objects and fascinating tours, the Museum of London Docklands is one of London’s hidden treasures.
From 19 June, explore a major free photography exhibition, Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom.

National Gallery
The National Gallery displays over 2,000 Western European paintings from the middle ages to the 20th century. Discover inspiring art by Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Turner, Renoir and Van Gogh. The pictures in the collection belong to the public and admission to see them is free. There are special exhibitions, lectures, video and audio-visual programmes, guided tours and holiday events for children and adults.

National Maritime Museum Greenwich
Discover stories about Britain’s encounter with the world at sea through our galleries that recall the romance of the great ocean liners, the history of trade across the Atlantic and the impact of the East India Company on British culture and more. See Nelson’s uniform from the Battle of Trafalgar and Prince Frederick’s beautiful gilded barge.
Children can shoot down a dastardly pirate ship in a new interactive game; older kids will enjoy our ship simulator.
We host free and ticketed events, from lectures by our curators, music nights to seasonal family celebrations.
On site eateries include Paul bakery, our Museum Café and our elegant 16 Seconds West Brasserie.

National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery houses the world’s largest collection of personalities and faces, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Visitors come face-to-face with the people who have shaped British history, from kings and queens to musicians and film stars. Artists featured range from Holbein to Hockney, and the collection includes work across all media, from painting and sculpture to photography and video.
As well as the permanent displays, the National Portrait Gallery has a diverse programme of exhibitions and free events, and a stunning rooftop restaurant with spectacular views across the London skyline.

Natural History Museum
Hundreds of exciting, interactive exhibits in one of London’s most beautiful landmark buildings. Highlights include the popular Dinosaurs gallery, Mammals display with the unforgettable model blue whale and the spectacular Central Hall, home to the Museum’s iconic Diplodocus skeleton.
Don’t miss the state-of-the-art Darwin Centre Cocoon where, on a self-guided tour, you can see hundreds of fascinating specimens and look into laboratories where scientists are at work.
The Museum offers a wide-ranging programme of temporary exhibitions and events, including chances to join experts in the Darwin Centre’s high-tech Attenborough Studio in topical discussions about science and nature.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

Royal Air Force Museum London
If you’re searching for something different, why not take off to the Royal Air Force Museum in Colindale and navigate your way through the history of aviation from the earliest balloon flight to the latest Eurofighter?
This world-class collection of more than 100 aircraft, aviation and wartime memorabilia offers a fun day out for all the family.
Don’t forget to visit the 3D cinema in Milestones of Flight, an awe-inspiring sound and light show that takes you back in time to the Battle of Britain; or the interactive gallery for children, Aeronauts, which contains a variety of games that teach them about flight. Open from 10:00 to 18:00 daily, offering free admission and ample parking.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

The Wallace Collection
A free national museum displaying superb works of art in an historic London town house. The collection was acquired principally in the 19th century by the 3rd and 4th Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess. The 28 rooms, many recently refurbished with elaborate gilding & wall silks, present collections of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain (many once owned by Madame de Pompadour and Queen Marie-Antoinette) together with paintings by Titian, Canaletto, Rembrandt and Gainsborough, Hals’ ‘The Laughing Cavalier’ and Fragonard’s ‘The Swing’, four armouries and wonderful Renaissance treasures. Dine in the beautiful glazed courtyard restuarant.

Victoria and Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum is the world’s greatest museum of art and design, representing more than 3,000 years of human creativity, with collections unrivalled in their scope and diversity.
In recent years, the V&A has undergone a dramatic programme of renewal and restoration. Highlights include the Medieval Renaissance galleries containing some of the greatest surviving treasures from the period, the breathtaking Jewellery gallery and the stunning British Galleries, illustrating the history of Britain through the nation’s art and design. In addition to its outstanding free permanent collection, the V&A offers a programme of temporary exhibitions and an extensive events programme.

Tate Modern
A visit to London isn’t complete without a trip to Tate Modern.
Britain’s national museum of modern and contemporary art from around the world is housed in the former Bankside Power Station on the banks of the Thames. The awe-inspiring Turbine Hall runs the length of the entire building and you can see amazing work for free by artists such as Cézanne, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Rothko, Dalí, Pollock, Warhol and Bourgeois.

Tate Britain
London’s Tate Britain holds the largest collection of British art in the world from 1500 to the present day. You’ll find masterpieces by Gainsborough, Hogarth, Millais, Whistler, as well as outstanding modern and contemporary artists such as Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst. We also have the largest collection of works by JMW Turner in the world.

V&A Museum of Childhood
The V&A Museum of Childhood houses the UK’s national collection of childhood objects, ranging in date from the 1600s to the present day.
As well as toys, dolls and games, the museum has a wealth of objects relating to aspects of childhood including home, childcare, play, learning and clothing.
Rare, hand-crafted objects sit alongside well-loved toys from the 20th century, allowing an insight into how different children might have lived, thought and felt, through the objects they were surrounded by throughout their childhood.
In addition, the museum runs temporary exhibitions and displays, activities, events and workshops, outreach projects and an award-winning programme for schools.

Museum information provided by Visit London

 

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

Samuel Johnson famously said, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.” London is by far one of the most exciting cities in the world. Here at Burlington School, we plan a variety of activities taking students all across London which creates a fun filled learning environment. However, students are encouraged to often go out on their own and find activities that may interest them. As a part of your learning experience, museums are often the best place to start. Therefore, we have put together a list of free museums which we think every student should visit while studying in London.

Bank of England Museum
Housed within the impressive walls of the Bank of England, this fascinating museum takes you through the history of the bank since its foundation in 1694 to its role today as the nation’s central bank.
There are gold bars dating from ancient times to the modern market bar, coins and a unique collection of banknotes. There are also many items you might not expect to find, such as the pikes and muskets used to defend the bank; the Roman pottery and mosaics uncovered when it was rebuilt in 1930; and documents relating to famous customers such as Horatio Nelson, George Washington and the Duchess of Marlborough.

The British Postal Museum & Archive
The leading resource for British postal history. Split between two sites.
The Royal Mail archive in Central London houses stamps, posters, post office records and design artwork, accessed via a public search room including a small exhibition space, 10 minutes walk from Farringdon Tube station.

The Museum Store in Debden, Essex, includes Rowland Hill’s desk, an extensive collection of pillar boxes, post office vans, telephone boxes and more, five minutes walk from Debden Tube station on the Central line.
Free guided tours of both the Archive and the Museum Store are available. Open on selected days throughout the year – see: www.postalheritage.org.uk for details.
IWM London: Imperial War Museum London

IWM London tells the story of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Discover our new First World War Galleries as well as our permanent exhibitions including The Lord Ashcroft Gallery: Extraordinary Heroes and Secret War. Explore stories and key moments from the Second World War in A Family in Wartime and The Holocaust Exhibition.

Museum of London
Step inside the Museum of London for an unforgettable journey through the capital’s turbulent past. Discover prehistoric London, see how the city changed under Romans and Saxons, wonder at medieval London and examine the tumultuous years when London was ravaged by civil wars, plague and fire.
Then venture into the Galleries of Modern London where you can walk the streets of Victorian London, take a stroll in recreated pleasure gardens and marvel at the magnificent Lord Mayor’s Coach.
From 9 October 2015, never-before-seen-objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on display in a major new exhibition. Find out more at museumoflondon.org.uk/crimemuseum.

Museum of London Docklands
Step inside a 200-year-old warehouse revealing the long history of London as a port through stories of trade, migration and commerce.
Discover a wealth of objects in modern galleries, including Sailortown, an atmospheric recreation of 19th-century London; and London, Sugar & Slavery, which reveals the city’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade. With ancient finds, unusual objects and fascinating tours, the Museum of London Docklands is one of London’s hidden treasures.
From 19 June, explore a major free photography exhibition, Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom.

National Gallery
The National Gallery displays over 2,000 Western European paintings from the middle ages to the 20th century. Discover inspiring art by Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Turner, Renoir and Van Gogh. The pictures in the collection belong to the public and admission to see them is free. There are special exhibitions, lectures, video and audio-visual programmes, guided tours and holiday events for children and adults.

National Maritime Museum Greenwich
Discover stories about Britain’s encounter with the world at sea through our galleries that recall the romance of the great ocean liners, the history of trade across the Atlantic and the impact of the East India Company on British culture and more. See Nelson’s uniform from the Battle of Trafalgar and Prince Frederick’s beautiful gilded barge.
Children can shoot down a dastardly pirate ship in a new interactive game; older kids will enjoy our ship simulator.
We host free and ticketed events, from lectures by our curators, music nights to seasonal family celebrations.
On site eateries include Paul bakery, our Museum Café and our elegant 16 Seconds West Brasserie.

National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery houses the world’s largest collection of personalities and faces, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Visitors come face-to-face with the people who have shaped British history, from kings and queens to musicians and film stars. Artists featured range from Holbein to Hockney, and the collection includes work across all media, from painting and sculpture to photography and video.
As well as the permanent displays, the National Portrait Gallery has a diverse programme of exhibitions and free events, and a stunning rooftop restaurant with spectacular views across the London skyline.

Natural History Museum
Hundreds of exciting, interactive exhibits in one of London’s most beautiful landmark buildings. Highlights include the popular Dinosaurs gallery, Mammals display with the unforgettable model blue whale and the spectacular Central Hall, home to the Museum’s iconic Diplodocus skeleton.
Don’t miss the state-of-the-art Darwin Centre Cocoon where, on a self-guided tour, you can see hundreds of fascinating specimens and look into laboratories where scientists are at work.
The Museum offers a wide-ranging programme of temporary exhibitions and events, including chances to join experts in the Darwin Centre’s high-tech Attenborough Studio in topical discussions about science and nature.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

Royal Air Force Museum London
If you’re searching for something different, why not take off to the Royal Air Force Museum in Colindale and navigate your way through the history of aviation from the earliest balloon flight to the latest Eurofighter?
This world-class collection of more than 100 aircraft, aviation and wartime memorabilia offers a fun day out for all the family.
Don’t forget to visit the 3D cinema in Milestones of Flight, an awe-inspiring sound and light show that takes you back in time to the Battle of Britain; or the interactive gallery for children, Aeronauts, which contains a variety of games that teach them about flight. Open from 10:00 to 18:00 daily, offering free admission and ample parking.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

The Wallace Collection
A free national museum displaying superb works of art in an historic London town house. The collection was acquired principally in the 19th century by the 3rd and 4th Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess. The 28 rooms, many recently refurbished with elaborate gilding & wall silks, present collections of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain (many once owned by Madame de Pompadour and Queen Marie-Antoinette) together with paintings by Titian, Canaletto, Rembrandt and Gainsborough, Hals’ ‘The Laughing Cavalier’ and Fragonard’s ‘The Swing’, four armouries and wonderful Renaissance treasures. Dine in the beautiful glazed courtyard restuarant.

Victoria and Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum is the world’s greatest museum of art and design, representing more than 3,000 years of human creativity, with collections unrivalled in their scope and diversity.
In recent years, the V&A has undergone a dramatic programme of renewal and restoration. Highlights include the Medieval Renaissance galleries containing some of the greatest surviving treasures from the period, the breathtaking Jewellery gallery and the stunning British Galleries, illustrating the history of Britain through the nation’s art and design. In addition to its outstanding free permanent collection, the V&A offers a programme of temporary exhibitions and an extensive events programme.

Tate Modern
A visit to London isn’t complete without a trip to Tate Modern.
Britain’s national museum of modern and contemporary art from around the world is housed in the former Bankside Power Station on the banks of the Thames. The awe-inspiring Turbine Hall runs the length of the entire building and you can see amazing work for free by artists such as Cézanne, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Rothko, Dalí, Pollock, Warhol and Bourgeois.

Tate Britain
London’s Tate Britain holds the largest collection of British art in the world from 1500 to the present day. You’ll find masterpieces by Gainsborough, Hogarth, Millais, Whistler, as well as outstanding modern and contemporary artists such as Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst. We also have the largest collection of works by JMW Turner in the world.

V&A Museum of Childhood
The V&A Museum of Childhood houses the UK’s national collection of childhood objects, ranging in date from the 1600s to the present day.
As well as toys, dolls and games, the museum has a wealth of objects relating to aspects of childhood including home, childcare, play, learning and clothing.
Rare, hand-crafted objects sit alongside well-loved toys from the 20th century, allowing an insight into how different children might have lived, thought and felt, through the objects they were surrounded by throughout their childhood.
In addition, the museum runs temporary exhibitions and displays, activities, events and workshops, outreach projects and an award-winning programme for schools.

Museum information provided by Visit London

 

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

Samuel Johnson famously said, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.” London is by far one of the most exciting cities in the world. Here at Burlington School, we plan a variety of activities taking students all across London which creates a fun filled learning environment. However, students are encouraged to often go out on their own and find activities that may interest them. As a part of your learning experience, museums are often the best place to start. Therefore, we have put together a list of free museums which we think every student should visit while studying in London.

Bank of England Museum
Housed within the impressive walls of the Bank of England, this fascinating museum takes you through the history of the bank since its foundation in 1694 to its role today as the nation’s central bank.
There are gold bars dating from ancient times to the modern market bar, coins and a unique collection of banknotes. There are also many items you might not expect to find, such as the pikes and muskets used to defend the bank; the Roman pottery and mosaics uncovered when it was rebuilt in 1930; and documents relating to famous customers such as Horatio Nelson, George Washington and the Duchess of Marlborough.

The British Postal Museum & Archive
The leading resource for British postal history. Split between two sites.
The Royal Mail archive in Central London houses stamps, posters, post office records and design artwork, accessed via a public search room including a small exhibition space, 10 minutes walk from Farringdon Tube station.

The Museum Store in Debden, Essex, includes Rowland Hill’s desk, an extensive collection of pillar boxes, post office vans, telephone boxes and more, five minutes walk from Debden Tube station on the Central line.
Free guided tours of both the Archive and the Museum Store are available. Open on selected days throughout the year – see: www.postalheritage.org.uk for details.

IWM London: Imperial War Museum London
IWM London tells the story of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Discover our new First World War Galleries as well as our permanent exhibitions including The Lord Ashcroft Gallery: Extraordinary Heroes and Secret War. Explore stories and key moments from the Second World War in A Family in Wartime and The Holocaust Exhibition.

Museum of London
Step inside the Museum of London for an unforgettable journey through the capital’s turbulent past. Discover prehistoric London, see how the city changed under Romans and Saxons, wonder at medieval London and examine the tumultuous years when London was ravaged by civil wars, plague and fire.
Then venture into the Galleries of Modern London where you can walk the streets of Victorian London, take a stroll in recreated pleasure gardens and marvel at the magnificent Lord Mayor’s Coach.
From 9 October 2015, never-before-seen-objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on display in a major new exhibition. Find out more at museumoflondon.org.uk/crimemuseum.

Museum of London Docklands
Step inside a 200-year-old warehouse revealing the long history of London as a port through stories of trade, migration and commerce.
Discover a wealth of objects in modern galleries, including Sailortown, an atmospheric recreation of 19th-century London; and London, Sugar & Slavery, which reveals the city’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade. With ancient finds, unusual objects and fascinating tours, the Museum of London Docklands is one of London’s hidden treasures.
From 19 June, explore a major free photography exhibition, Soldiers and Suffragettes: The Photography of Christina Broom.

National Gallery
The National Gallery displays over 2,000 Western European paintings from the middle ages to the 20th century. Discover inspiring art by Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Turner, Renoir and Van Gogh. The pictures in the collection belong to the public and admission to see them is free. There are special exhibitions, lectures, video and audio-visual programmes, guided tours and holiday events for children and adults.

National Maritime Museum Greenwich
Discover stories about Britain’s encounter with the world at sea through our galleries that recall the romance of the great ocean liners, the history of trade across the Atlantic and the impact of the East India Company on British culture and more. See Nelson’s uniform from the Battle of Trafalgar and Prince Frederick’s beautiful gilded barge.
Children can shoot down a dastardly pirate ship in a new interactive game; older kids will enjoy our ship simulator.
We host free and ticketed events, from lectures by our curators, music nights to seasonal family celebrations.
On site eateries include Paul bakery, our Museum Café and our elegant 16 Seconds West Brasserie.

National Portrait Gallery
The National Portrait Gallery houses the world’s largest collection of personalities and faces, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Visitors come face-to-face with the people who have shaped British history, from kings and queens to musicians and film stars. Artists featured range from Holbein to Hockney, and the collection includes work across all media, from painting and sculpture to photography and video.
As well as the permanent displays, the National Portrait Gallery has a diverse programme of exhibitions and free events, and a stunning rooftop restaurant with spectacular views across the London skyline.

Natural History Museum
Hundreds of exciting, interactive exhibits in one of London’s most beautiful landmark buildings. Highlights include the popular Dinosaurs gallery, Mammals display with the unforgettable model blue whale and the spectacular Central Hall, home to the Museum’s iconic Diplodocus skeleton.
Don’t miss the state-of-the-art Darwin Centre Cocoon where, on a self-guided tour, you can see hundreds of fascinating specimens and look into laboratories where scientists are at work.
The Museum offers a wide-ranging programme of temporary exhibitions and events, including chances to join experts in the Darwin Centre’s high-tech Attenborough Studio in topical discussions about science and nature.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

Royal Air Force Museum London
If you’re searching for something different, why not take off to the Royal Air Force Museum in Colindale and navigate your way through the history of aviation from the earliest balloon flight to the latest Eurofighter?
This world-class collection of more than 100 aircraft, aviation and wartime memorabilia offers a fun day out for all the family.
Don’t forget to visit the 3D cinema in Milestones of Flight, an awe-inspiring sound and light show that takes you back in time to the Battle of Britain; or the interactive gallery for children, Aeronauts, which contains a variety of games that teach them about flight. Open from 10:00 to 18:00 daily, offering free admission and ample parking.

Science Museum
The Science Museum is the most visited science and technology museum in Europe. There are over 15,000 objects on display, including world-famous objects such as the Apollo 10 command capsule and Stephenson’s Rocket.
Our interactive galleries bring to life first scientific principles and contemporary science debates. Plus, you can experience what it’s like to fly with the Red Arrows or blast off into space on an Apollo space mission in our stunning 3D and 4D simulators or watch a film on a screen taller than four double-decker buses in the IMAX 3D Cinema.

The Wallace Collection
A free national museum displaying superb works of art in an historic London town house. The collection was acquired principally in the 19th century by the 3rd and 4th Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess. The 28 rooms, many recently refurbished with elaborate gilding & wall silks, present collections of French 18th-century painting, furniture and porcelain (many once owned by Madame de Pompadour and Queen Marie-Antoinette) together with paintings by Titian, Canaletto, Rembrandt and Gainsborough, Hals’ ‘The Laughing Cavalier’ and Fragonard’s ‘The Swing’, four armouries and wonderful Renaissance treasures. Dine in the beautiful glazed courtyard restuarant.

Victoria and Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum is the world’s greatest museum of art and design, representing more than 3,000 years of human creativity, with collections unrivalled in their scope and diversity.
In recent years, the V&A has undergone a dramatic programme of renewal and restoration. Highlights include the Medieval Renaissance galleries containing some of the greatest surviving treasures from the period, the breathtaking Jewellery gallery and the stunning British Galleries, illustrating the history of Britain through the nation’s art and design. In addition to its outstanding free permanent collection, the V&A offers a programme of temporary exhibitions and an extensive events programme.

Tate Modern
A visit to London isn’t complete without a trip to Tate Modern.
Britain’s national museum of modern and contemporary art from around the world is housed in the former Bankside Power Station on the banks of the Thames. The awe-inspiring Turbine Hall runs the length of the entire building and you can see amazing work for free by artists such as Cézanne, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Rothko, Dalí, Pollock, Warhol and Bourgeois.

Tate Britain
London’s Tate Britain holds the largest collection of British art in the world from 1500 to the present day. You’ll find masterpieces by Gainsborough, Hogarth, Millais, Whistler, as well as outstanding modern and contemporary artists such as Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Damien Hirst. We also have the largest collection of works by JMW Turner in the world.

V&A Museum of Childhood
The V&A Museum of Childhood houses the UK’s national collection of childhood objects, ranging in date from the 1600s to the present day.
As well as toys, dolls and games, the museum has a wealth of objects relating to aspects of childhood including home, childcare, play, learning and clothing.
Rare, hand-crafted objects sit alongside well-loved toys from the 20th century, allowing an insight into how different children might have lived, thought and felt, through the objects they were surrounded by throughout their childhood.
In addition, the museum runs temporary exhibitions and displays, activities, events and workshops, outreach projects and an award-winning programme for schools.

Museum information provided by Visit London

How to use Adjectives

How to use Adjectives

In today’s Learn English blog we are focusing on adjectives. Adjective are words that are used to describe or provide information about a person or thing. Below are examples of adjectives.
A beautiful house
A red dress
A sunny day
An Italian accent

We are able to use most adjectives in two positions: attribute adjectives occur before the noun they are describing and a predicative adjective which is used after certain verbs.

a black car [attributive]
The car was black. [predicative]

Some adjectives are what we call gradable. Gradable refers to the fact that their meaning can be modified (made strong, weaker or altered otherwise) by placing what is called an adverb in front of them. See the examples below.
An expensive motor bike
A very expensive motor bike
a fairly expensive car
an extremely expensive car

The adverbs very, fairly, and extremely are telling us where this particular car belongs on the scale of ‘expensiveness’. By using them, we can make a significant difference to the meaning of an adjective.

Non-gradable adjectives are those with meanings which cannot be modified by adverbs. For example:
the western side of the mountain
electronic devices
a nuclear reactor

It would be very strange to see any of the adjectives in the above examples being used with modifying adverbs such as very, fairly, or extremely; things are either western, electronic, or nuclear, or they’re not. These sorts of adjectives are part of the category known as classifying adjectives.

How to use Adjectives

In today’s Learn English blog we are focusing on adjectives. Adjective are words that are used to describe or provide information about a person or thing. Below are examples of adjectives.
A beautiful house
A red dress
A sunny day
An Italian accent

We are able to use most adjectives in two positions: attribute adjectives occur before the noun they are describing and a predicative adjective which is used after certain verbs.

a black car [attributive]
The car was black. [predicative]

Some adjectives are what we call gradable. Gradable refers to the fact that their meaning can be modified (made strong, weaker or altered otherwise) by placing what is called an adverb in front of them. See the examples below.
An expensive motor bike
A very expensive motor bike
a fairly expensive car
an extremely expensive car

The adverbs very, fairly, and extremely are telling us where this particular car belongs on the scale of ‘expensiveness’. By using them, we can make a significant difference to the meaning of an adjective.

Non-gradable adjectives are those with meanings which cannot be modified by adverbs. For example:
the western side of the mountain
electronic devices
a nuclear reactor

It would be very strange to see any of the adjectives in the above examples being used with modifying adverbs such as very, fairly, or extremely; things are either western, electronic, or nuclear, or they’re not. These sorts of adjectives are part of the category known as classifying adjectives.

How to use Adjectives

In today’s Learn English blog we are focusing on adjectives. Adjective are words that are used to describe or provide information about a person or thing. Below are examples of adjectives.
A beautiful house
A red dress
A sunny day
An Italian accent

We are able to use most adjectives in two positions: attribute adjectives occur before the noun they are describing and a predicative adjective which is used after certain verbs.

a black car [attributive]
The car was black. [predicative]

Some adjectives are what we call gradable. Gradable refers to the fact that their meaning can be modified (made strong, weaker or altered otherwise) by placing what is called an adverb in front of them. See the examples below.
An expensive motor bike
A very expensive motor bike
a fairly expensive car
an extremely expensive car

The adverbs very, fairly, and extremely are telling us where this particular car belongs on the scale of ‘expensiveness’. By using them, we can make a significant difference to the meaning of an adjective.

Non-gradable adjectives are those with meanings which cannot be modified by adverbs. For example:
the western side of the mountain
electronic devices
a nuclear reactor

It would be very strange to see any of the adjectives in the above examples being used with modifying adverbs such as very, fairly, or extremely; things are either western, electronic, or nuclear, or they’re not. These sorts of adjectives are part of the category known as classifying adjectives.

How to use Adjectives

In today’s Learn English blog we are focusing on adjectives. Adjective are words that are used to describe or provide information about a person or thing. Below are examples of adjectives.
A beautiful house
A red dress
A sunny day
An Italian accent

We are able to use most adjectives in two positions: attribute adjectives occur before the noun they are describing and a predicative adjective which is used after certain verbs.

a black car [attributive]
The car was black. [predicative]

Some adjectives are what we call gradable. Gradable refers to the fact that their meaning can be modified (made strong, weaker or altered otherwise) by placing what is called an adverb in front of them. See the examples below.
An expensive motor bike
A very expensive motor bike
a fairly expensive car
an extremely expensive car

The adverbs very, fairly, and extremely are telling us where this particular car belongs on the scale of ‘expensiveness’. By using them, we can make a significant difference to the meaning of an adjective.

Non-gradable adjectives are those with meanings which cannot be modified by adverbs. For example:
the western side of the mountain
electronic devices
a nuclear reactor

It would be very strange to see any of the adjectives in the above examples being used with modifying adverbs such as very, fairly, or extremely; things are either western, electronic, or nuclear, or they’re not. These sorts of adjectives are part of the category known as classifying adjectives.

How to use Adjectives

In today’s Learn English blog we are focusing on adjectives. Adjective are words that are used to describe or provide information about a person or thing. Below are examples of adjectives.
A beautiful house
A red dress
A sunny day
An Italian accent

We are able to use most adjectives in two positions: attribute adjectives occur before the noun they are describing and a predicative adjective which is used after certain verbs.

a black car [attributive]
The car was black. [predicative]

Some adjectives are what we call gradable. Gradable refers to the fact that their meaning can be modified (made strong, weaker or altered otherwise) by placing what is called an adverb in front of them. See the examples below.
An expensive motor bike
A very expensive motor bike
a fairly expensive car
an extremely expensive car

The adverbs very, fairly, and extremely are telling us where this particular car belongs on the scale of ‘expensiveness’. By using them, we can make a significant difference to the meaning of an adjective.

Non-gradable adjectives are those with meanings which cannot be modified by adverbs. For example:
the western side of the mountain
electronic devices
a nuclear reactor

It would be very strange to see any of the adjectives in the above examples being used with modifying adverbs such as very, fairly, or extremely; things are either western, electronic, or nuclear, or they’re not. These sorts of adjectives are part of the category known as classifying adjectives.

How to use Adjectives

In today’s Learn English blog we are focusing on adjectives. Adjective are words that are used to describe or provide information about a person or thing. Below are examples of adjectives.
A beautiful house
A red dress
A sunny day
An Italian accent

We are able to use most adjectives in two positions: attribute adjectives occur before the noun they are describing and a predicative adjective which is used after certain verbs.

a black car [attributive]
The car was black. [predicative]

Some adjectives are what we call gradable. Gradable refers to the fact that their meaning can be modified (made strong, weaker or altered otherwise) by placing what is called an adverb in front of them. See the examples below.
An expensive motor bike
A very expensive motor bike
a fairly expensive car
an extremely expensive car

The adverbs very, fairly, and extremely are telling us where this particular car belongs on the scale of ‘expensiveness’. By using them, we can make a significant difference to the meaning of an adjective.

Non-gradable adjectives are those with meanings which cannot be modified by adverbs. For example:
the western side of the mountain
electronic devices
a nuclear reactor

It would be very strange to see any of the adjectives in the above examples being used with modifying adverbs such as very, fairly, or extremely; things are either western, electronic, or nuclear, or they’re not. These sorts of adjectives are part of the category known as classifying adjectives.

How to use Adjectives

In today’s Learn English blog we are focusing on adjectives. Adjective are words that are used to describe or provide information about a person or thing. Below are examples of adjectives.
A beautiful house
A red dress
A sunny day
An Italian accent

We are able to use most adjectives in two positions: attribute adjectives occur before the noun they are describing and a predicative adjective which is used after certain verbs.

a black car [attributive]
The car was black. [predicative]

Some adjectives are what we call gradable. Gradable refers to the fact that their meaning can be modified (made strong, weaker or altered otherwise) by placing what is called an adverb in front of them. See the examples below.
An expensive motor bike
A very expensive motor bike
a fairly expensive car
an extremely expensive car

The adverbs very, fairly, and extremely are telling us where this particular car belongs on the scale of ‘expensiveness’. By using them, we can make a significant difference to the meaning of an adjective.

Non-gradable adjectives are those with meanings which cannot be modified by adverbs. For example:
the western side of the mountain
electronic devices
a nuclear reactor

It would be very strange to see any of the adjectives in the above examples being used with modifying adverbs such as very, fairly, or extremely; things are either western, electronic, or nuclear, or they’re not. These sorts of adjectives are part of the category known as classifying adjectives.

Using Present Perfect Continuous Tense

Speaking English

Speaking in the correct tense is an essential part of communicating in English. Whether we are speaking to our friends or having more formal business communication, the tense we use can have a significant impact on the message we are trying to deliver. In today’s blog, we will be focusing on using the perfect continuous tense.

The present perfect continuous tense helps us to indicate when an action was started sometime in the past and is still continuing now. We often hear students confusing this particular tense with the present continuous tense. The present continuous tense however should only be used to speak about something which is happening at the moment of speaking. Below we will indicate some examples of how the tenses are often misused.

Example One

She is living in London for the last 2 years.

In this particular sentence, it has been indicated that she moved to London to live 2 years ago and she is still living there now. Therefore the correct tense that should be used is the present perfect continuous tense and not the present continuous tense.

Correct Answer

She has been living in London for the last 2 years.

Example 2

Gareth is working in this store since last month

Correct Answer

Gareth has been working in this store since last month

Additionally, the present perfect continuous tense should also be used if the action has just finished and we are interested in the results.

Example 3

She has been cooking all morning, the food looks delicious.

Example 4

It has been raining all night so the street is still wet.

We said earlier, the present continuous tense is used when the event is happening at the moment of speaking. See examples below.

Example 5
I’m leaving school now. I’ll be home in an hour.

Example 6
Be silent please. The baby is sleeping.

Example 7

Gareth is walking home from school by himself.

CV Writing Tips

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

Here at Burlington school, our students are always asking for help with their CVs. Therefore, we have decided to share a blog article on some best practices when constructing your CV and cover letter. These tips are helpful for both natives and none natives of the UK.

Before you start the process of writing your CV, it is important that you carefully read the job advert so that you can be clear about the requirements for the role you’re applying. Tailoring both your application letter and CV to the job is extremely important, focus on your qualifications and experience that are relevant.

Dos and Don’ts
Here are some general points to bear in mind when preparing your CV:

Do

keep your CV brief and concise: there is no need to go into a lot of detail about your education or employment history.

– try to keep your CV to one or two sides of A4 paper.
– use brief, informative sentences, short paragraphs, and standard English.
– when describing your responsibilities and achievements, start each point with an action verb (such as teaching, leading, developing): this creates more impact.
– use bold type or bullet points to highlight key information.
– proofread for spelling, grammar, or punctuation mistakes: many employers routinely discard CVs that contain this type of mistake.
– update your CV regularly as your situation changes.

Don’t

– go into too much detail: employers are too busy to read rambling or unfocused CVs.
– leave gaps in your employment history: add a sentence or two explaining any periods that are not accounted for.
– use too many different fonts or typefaces: keep to one or two that are clear and easy to read.
– use inappropriate colours, graphics, or photos.
– name people as referees unless you’ve confirmed that they’re happy to provide a reference for you.

Structuring your CV

A CV should be clear and well structured, with a limited number of main sections, so that an employer can pinpoint the information they’re looking for quickly and easily. Here are some broad guidelines on how to structure an effective CV

Personal details

Always begin with your personal details, i.e.:

– name
– address
– telephone number (home and/or mobile)
– email address (personal, rather than work)
– personal profile

There’s no need to include your date of birth, your marital status, or your nationality unless the job advert has specifically asked you for this information.

A personal profile is a way of introducing yourself to a potential employer. It outlines who you are, what skills and qualities you have, and why you would be an asset to the company. It also provides a good opportunity to tailor your application to the requirements of a job before you move on to the details of your experience or qualifications.

Employment history

Beginning with your current job, if you have one:

Give a brief outline of your current role, responsibilities, and skills, focusing on those which are most relevant for the job you’re applying for.

Work backwards through other jobs you’ve held, giving a brief summary of each, highlighting any aspect that’s particularly relevant to your application. Include work placements and voluntary work, if applicable.

Unless you’re very young, or you’re applying for your first main job, it isn’t necessary to list all the less important jobs you may have done. You could summarize them as, for example, ‘various temporary administrative posts’.

Avoid leaving unexplained gaps in your employment history as this can create a negative impression. If you’ve been bringing up a child, unemployed, or taking a career break, for example, add a sentence explaining this.

Treat any significant periods of unemployment in a positive way: you could outline any activities you engaged in while you were out of work, such as carrying out voluntary work or learning new skills.

Educational qualifications

If you’re still studying, start by giving this information, making it clear that your studies are ongoing and when the course is due to end.

If you’ve completed any other further or higher education, outline this next.
Then give your secondary school or schools and the dates you attended, together with:
– a list of your A level (or Scottish Higher or equivalent) subjects and grades
– brief details of GCSEs, Scottish Standard Grades, NVQs, or equivalent qualifications (only give full details of these if the employer has specifically asked for them or the subjects are relevant to the job in question).

Any other skills, achievements, or training

List any relevant courses or training you’ve completed (e.g. to gain IT skills or knowledge of a foreign language).
Mention any significant awards you have received or other professional achievements that would be relevant to the job you are applying for.
Interests or pastimes

A brief outline of your interests and hobbies can help to give a potential employer an insight into the type of person you are. They may also indicate skills you have that you are not using in your current position.
Referees

Give the names and contact details of people who would be willing to give you a reference. Ideally, one person should be from your current (or most recent) place of work, while the second could be from a previous employer.

If you’re applying for your first job, you could give the name of a tutor, teacher, or anyone who knows you well enough to vouch for your character (apart from members of your family).

Always make sure that the people you have in mind are happy to provide a reference for you before you add their names to your CV.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

10 British Fast Food Restaurants Worth Checking Out

One might think, “Do I really want fast food when traveling?” but, actually, in between sit down meals at say one of The Shard’s high-profile restaurants, or the celebrity-soaked Chiltern Firehouse, a quick bite could be just what you need to keep up that go get ‘em energy when traveling. It’d be a shame to show up flustered due to a food headache.

Here are some quick service British takeaway spots that might, well, hit the spot:

1. Leon

What to expect: Gourmet meals in a box.
Locations: There are too many to list, with 20 spots throughout London including two at Heathrow, which you can find here.
Menu: Co-founders John Vincent and Henry Dimbleby, the guys behind Leon, combine the easiness of fast food and healthiness with their vision: “There is something magical about fast food. Both of us, as children, considered a trip to a fast food joint the biggest treat imaginable.” The menu covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and the bits in between, with items like a poached egg pot and saucy beans (in a takeaway cup if you like), delectable lunch boxes containing tasty meals like pork chili with apple or ruby mackerel and lentil salad, or a meatball burger with a pot of veggies on the side. Leon also offers a child-size menu.
Must try item: Chicken and chorizo club.

2. Poppies

What to expect: Fish and chips with mushy peas.
Locations: Spitafields in East London and Camden Town in North London.
Menu: Poppies’ owner, Pop Newland, has been serving fish and chips in the East End all his life. The menu includes mouth watering fresh fish cooked in crunchy batter, served with golden chips and classic homemade mushy peas. In terms of fish you can choose from halibut, code roe, skate, rock, plaice, and mackerel, just to name some of the options. Side orders include chips (obviously), seasonal salad, bread and butter, Heinz beans, or a pickled egg. The children’s menu offers cod bites and chips.
Must try item: Cod and chips.

3. West Cornwall Pasty Company

What to expect:Hot pockets.
Locations: Like the name of the store says, the pasties hail from Cornwall, England, but their shops are found throughout the U.K, with 10 spots in London alone.
Menu:The savory pies are filled with an assortment of ingredients including the traditional Cornish pasty stuffed with skirt beef and potatoes, the steak and stilton, chicken and bacon, pork and apple, and lamb and minted peas. The list goes on, which you can find here.
Must try item: Chicken and veggie pasty.

4. Chicken Shop

What to expect: Spitfire chicken.
Locations: The Chicken Shop has four locations in London: Tooting, Kenish Town, Whitechapel, and Holborn.
Menu:
You can customize your order depending on how hungry you are, selecting a whole, half, or quarter chicken. The fieriness of your dish can be determined by choosing hot or smoky. Side dishes, like crinkle cut fries, coleslaw, or corn on the cob, will round out your meal. You can also pick up a Dirty Burger at the Whitechapel and Kentish Town locations.
Must try item: Apple pie.

5. Prêt A Manger

What to expect: All natural.
Locations: There are close to 300 Prêt A Manger stores in the U.K. including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Scotland and Cardiff, Wales. You can check out all of the locations here.
Menu: Pret is a go-to lunch place for us in NYC, but it originated in London in 1986. College friends, Sinclair and June, sought to make sandwiches avoid of preservatives and chemicals, using natural ingredients. The food found in Prêt is made fresh every day. You can sit and have a quick bite, or take it to go. Here’s the menu made up of sandwiches, salads, sushi, and more.
Must try item: Smoked salmon and butter sandwich.

6. Yo! Sushi

What to expect: Mobile sushi.
Locations:Yo! Sushi can be found throughout the U.K., with close to 100 stores, and 65 of them being in London. You can check out the locations here.
Menu: The menu includes over 80 dishes including rice and noodles, sashimi, hand rolls, soups, and salads. If you decide to sit and eat at the restaurant, the food will conveniently come to you on a conveyer belt. (Not sure if it’s the same deal with the bill.) Or you can get your food tidied up in takeaway containers. Also, you can order online for pick up or delivery, making the experience even faster.
Must try item: Bottomless bowl of miso.

7. Square Pie

What to expect: Pie squared.
Locations: Square Pie has four shops located in London: Old Spitafields Market, Westfield White City, and Westfield Stratford City. As well, they have a store in Bluewater, Kent.
Menu: The savory, square-shaped pies, come in steak and Guinness, lamb and rosemary, spinach and sweet potato, and more. You can check out the entire list of tasty treats here.
Must try item: Steak and Guinness.

8. Wimpy

What to expect: Hamburger and fries.
Locations: The Wimpy franchise has approximately 90 restaurants found throughout the U.K. Opening in 1955, it’s the first fast food hamburger joint to make its way to Britain. And, yes, it is named after Popeye’s hamburger loving friend J. Wellington Wimpy.
Menu: Wimpy is a British institution that people can rely on, not having changed its menu much since first opening (not even when Ronald McDonald moved to town in 1974). Sure, they serve a traditional English breakfast, maybe a salad here and there, but people really go for the hamburgers. And, the quick service.
Must try item: The Knickerbocker Glory.

9. Tortilla

What to expect: Fresh burritos.
Locations: Tortilla has 12 locations, mostly in Central London, as well as shops in Kent, Brighton, and Leeds, England.
Menu: American expats, Brandon and Jen, searched for burritos like the ones they grew up on in California, and after coming up empty, opened their own burrito shop in 2007. The married couple pride themselves on using fresh ingredients, with all of the burritos and tacos being made in house daily. If you’re in a super rush, you can order online for pick up or delivery.
Must try item: Pulled pork, Mexican rice, pinto beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and cheese in a wrap.

10. The Kati Roll Company

What to expect: Wrapped curry.
Location: There is only one location, but worth the stop, which is at 24 Poland Street (between Great Marlborough St. and Oxford St.) in London.
Menu: Londoners love their curry, and their sandwiches, and this is sort of curried meat wrapped in a flatbread, which can be eaten while walking. You can’t get much more convenient than that. The restaurant provides two helpful sections on their website: “Meet Our Rolls” and “How to Eat a Kati Roll.” Now that you’ve been introduced to the Kati Roll, you can choose between the chicken tikka, grilled beef, or minced-lamb. You can check out the entire list of options here.
Must try item: Chicken tikka wrap.

London’s Best Museums for Kids

British Transport Museum
There are lots of fun things to do in London for kids of all ages. Many London attractions are free so you can find activities for kids without spending a small fortune.

From the Natural History Museum to the British Museum, there are a whole host of places to visit in London which provide activities for kids. Most London museums offer special programmes of free activities for children and almost all are free to enter!

Whether you’re looking for things to see at the V&A, exploring the gardens at the Horniman, or taking a trip of discovery at the Science Museum, take your pick of the top family-friendly museums in London listed below.

Bank of England Museum

Teach your kids the value of money the fun way at the Bank of England Museum. Look at gold bars dating from ancient times – and test your strength by trying to lift one – hear unexpected tales about the Bank’s ghostly nun, and find out how the pound sign was developed. Admission is free and includes an activity sheet.

The British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s greatest museums, showcasing objects from prehistoric to modern times. Highlights include the Rosetta Stone and the mummies in the Ancient Egypt collection. Entry is free but special exhibitions require tickets. There are free activity backpacks available as well as special events tailored towards children.

The Geffrye Museum

Take your kids on a walk through time and explore the history of English interiors at the Geffrye Museum, set in 18th-century almshouses. Entry is free for the main museum. There is a charge for adults entering the restored almshouse but entry is still free for children under 16.

HMS Belfast

Step aboard Europe’s largest preserved WW2 warship and experience the legend that is the HMS Belfast. The ship has nine decks steeped in history, from the Captain’s Bridge to the sailor’s mess, and offers hands-on activities for children. Children under 16 go free. Free audio tours are also available.

Horniman Museum and Gardens

The Horniman Museum is a children’s paradise. As well as a fantastic programme of free activities for kids, it has an aquarium, a hands-on centre and a Nature Base, complete with live animals, plus 16 acres of beautiful gardens perfect for picnics. Entry is free, with charges for the aquarium and some exhibitions.

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum hosts exhibitions connecting transport with the history of London. Inside you’ll find more than 80 vehicles, including a red London bus and the world’s first Underground train. The galleries are full of exhibits for children to play on. Look out for Interchange, the children’s interactive area. Free entry for under 17s.

Museum of London

Take the kids on an unforgettable journey into the story of London’s past – from a time when lions roamed Trafalgar Square, through the city under Roman rule, to the 21st century capital: there’s something for all ages. Don’t miss the Galleries of Modern London, too. Entry is free, as are family events at weekends.

Museum of London Docklands

At Museum of London Docklands kids can explore the history of the river Thames, discover the fate of captured pirates and take cover in a WW2 bomb shelter. Let them loose in the Mudlarks Gallery with a soft play area for younger children and interactive exhibits for older kids. Entry is free, as are family events on Saturdays.

National Maritime Museum

In the heart of Greenwich, the National Maritime Museum offers plenty to engage and entertain young minds, from loading a cargo ship and firing a cannon at pirates and steer a ship into port in the Children’s Gallery. Entry is free and the museum also runs a programme of free family events at weekends.

Natural History Museum

Meet a life-sized blue whale, a roaring T-Rex and a gigantic crocodile; the Natural History Museum has something to keep all young visitors entertained. Delve into the Darwin Centre, get hands-on at Investigate – the science lab for 7-14 year olds – or get shaken up in the earthquake machine. Entry is free, some charges apply.

Science Museum

Museums in London don’t get more family friendly than the Science Museum! Trace the history of the space rocket, meet Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel and catch a 3D movie; all for free. There are galleries for under 5s, the Pattern Pod for 5-8-year-olds and Launchpad, a hands-on exhibition for teenagers. Some charges apply.

V&A Museum of Childhood

Take a trip down memory lane and keep kids entertained with a visit to the V&A Museum of Childhood. Join in with free daily activities, from storytelling to treasure hunts, or explore the collections of rag dolls, teddy bears and dolls’ houses dating from the 1600s. Entry is free, some charges apply.

For more information please visit the Visit London

British Transport Museum
There are lots of fun things to do in London for kids of all ages. Many London attractions are free so you can find activities for kids without spending a small fortune.

From the Natural History Museum to the British Museum, there are a whole host of places to visit in London which provide activities for kids. Most London museums offer special programmes of free activities for children and almost all are free to enter!

Whether you’re looking for things to see at the V&A, exploring the gardens at the Horniman, or taking a trip of discovery at the Science Museum, take your pick of the top family-friendly museums in London listed below.

Bank of England Museum

Teach your kids the value of money the fun way at the Bank of England Museum. Look at gold bars dating from ancient times – and test your strength by trying to lift one – hear unexpected tales about the Bank’s ghostly nun, and find out how the pound sign was developed. Admission is free and includes an activity sheet.

The British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s greatest museums, showcasing objects from prehistoric to modern times. Highlights include the Rosetta Stone and the mummies in the Ancient Egypt collection. Entry is free but special exhibitions require tickets. There are free activity backpacks available as well as special events tailored towards children.

The Geffrye Museum

Take your kids on a walk through time and explore the history of English interiors at the Geffrye Museum, set in 18th-century almshouses. Entry is free for the main museum. There is a charge for adults entering the restored almshouse but entry is still free for children under 16.

HMS Belfast

Step aboard Europe’s largest preserved WW2 warship and experience the legend that is the HMS Belfast. The ship has nine decks steeped in history, from the Captain’s Bridge to the sailor’s mess, and offers hands-on activities for children. Children under 16 go free. Free audio tours are also available.

Horniman Museum and Gardens

The Horniman Museum is a children’s paradise. As well as a fantastic programme of free activities for kids, it has an aquarium, a hands-on centre and a Nature Base, complete with live animals, plus 16 acres of beautiful gardens perfect for picnics. Entry is free, with charges for the aquarium and some exhibitions.

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum hosts exhibitions connecting transport with the history of London. Inside you’ll find more than 80 vehicles, including a red London bus and the world’s first Underground train. The galleries are full of exhibits for children to play on. Look out for Interchange, the children’s interactive area. Free entry for under 17s.

Museum of London

Take the kids on an unforgettable journey into the story of London’s past – from a time when lions roamed Trafalgar Square, through the city under Roman rule, to the 21st century capital: there’s something for all ages. Don’t miss the Galleries of Modern London, too. Entry is free, as are family events at weekends.

Museum of London Docklands

At Museum of London Docklands kids can explore the history of the river Thames, discover the fate of captured pirates and take cover in a WW2 bomb shelter. Let them loose in the Mudlarks Gallery with a soft play area for younger children and interactive exhibits for older kids. Entry is free, as are family events on Saturdays.

National Maritime Museum

In the heart of Greenwich, the National Maritime Museum offers plenty to engage and entertain young minds, from loading a cargo ship and firing a cannon at pirates and steer a ship into port in the Children’s Gallery. Entry is free and the museum also runs a programme of free family events at weekends.

Natural History Museum

Meet a life-sized blue whale, a roaring T-Rex and a gigantic crocodile; the Natural History Museum has something to keep all young visitors entertained. Delve into the Darwin Centre, get hands-on at Investigate – the science lab for 7-14 year olds – or get shaken up in the earthquake machine. Entry is free, some charges apply.

Science Museum

Museums in London don’t get more family friendly than the Science Museum! Trace the history of the space rocket, meet Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel and catch a 3D movie; all for free. There are galleries for under 5s, the Pattern Pod for 5-8-year-olds and Launchpad, a hands-on exhibition for teenagers. Some charges apply.

V&A Museum of Childhood

Take a trip down memory lane and keep kids entertained with a visit to the V&A Museum of Childhood. Join in with free daily activities, from storytelling to treasure hunts, or explore the collections of rag dolls, teddy bears and dolls’ houses dating from the 1600s. Entry is free, some charges apply.

For more information please visit the Visit London

British Transport Museum
There are lots of fun things to do in London for kids of all ages. Many London attractions are free so you can find activities for kids without spending a small fortune.

From the Natural History Museum to the British Museum, there are a whole host of places to visit in London which provide activities for kids. Most London museums offer special programmes of free activities for children and almost all are free to enter!

Whether you’re looking for things to see at the V&A, exploring the gardens at the Horniman, or taking a trip of discovery at the Science Museum, take your pick of the top family-friendly museums in London listed below.

Bank of England Museum

Teach your kids the value of money the fun way at the Bank of England Museum. Look at gold bars dating from ancient times – and test your strength by trying to lift one – hear unexpected tales about the Bank’s ghostly nun, and find out how the pound sign was developed. Admission is free and includes an activity sheet.

The British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s greatest museums, showcasing objects from prehistoric to modern times. Highlights include the Rosetta Stone and the mummies in the Ancient Egypt collection. Entry is free but special exhibitions require tickets. There are free activity backpacks available as well as special events tailored towards children.

The Geffrye Museum

Take your kids on a walk through time and explore the history of English interiors at the Geffrye Museum, set in 18th-century almshouses. Entry is free for the main museum. There is a charge for adults entering the restored almshouse but entry is still free for children under 16.

HMS Belfast

Step aboard Europe’s largest preserved WW2 warship and experience the legend that is the HMS Belfast. The ship has nine decks steeped in history, from the Captain’s Bridge to the sailor’s mess, and offers hands-on activities for children. Children under 16 go free. Free audio tours are also available.

Horniman Museum and Gardens

The Horniman Museum is a children’s paradise. As well as a fantastic programme of free activities for kids, it has an aquarium, a hands-on centre and a Nature Base, complete with live animals, plus 16 acres of beautiful gardens perfect for picnics. Entry is free, with charges for the aquarium and some exhibitions.

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum hosts exhibitions connecting transport with the history of London. Inside you’ll find more than 80 vehicles, including a red London bus and the world’s first Underground train. The galleries are full of exhibits for children to play on. Look out for Interchange, the children’s interactive area. Free entry for under 17s.

Museum of London

Take the kids on an unforgettable journey into the story of London’s past – from a time when lions roamed Trafalgar Square, through the city under Roman rule, to the 21st century capital: there’s something for all ages. Don’t miss the Galleries of Modern London, too. Entry is free, as are family events at weekends.

Museum of London Docklands

At Museum of London Docklands kids can explore the history of the river Thames, discover the fate of captured pirates and take cover in a WW2 bomb shelter. Let them loose in the Mudlarks Gallery with a soft play area for younger children and interactive exhibits for older kids. Entry is free, as are family events on Saturdays.

National Maritime Museum

In the heart of Greenwich, the National Maritime Museum offers plenty to engage and entertain young minds, from loading a cargo ship and firing a cannon at pirates and steer a ship into port in the Children’s Gallery. Entry is free and the museum also runs a programme of free family events at weekends.

Natural History Museum

Meet a life-sized blue whale, a roaring T-Rex and a gigantic crocodile; the Natural History Museum has something to keep all young visitors entertained. Delve into the Darwin Centre, get hands-on at Investigate – the science lab for 7-14 year olds – or get shaken up in the earthquake machine. Entry is free, some charges apply.

Science Museum

Museums in London don’t get more family friendly than the Science Museum! Trace the history of the space rocket, meet Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel and catch a 3D movie; all for free. There are galleries for under 5s, the Pattern Pod for 5-8-year-olds and Launchpad, a hands-on exhibition for teenagers. Some charges apply.

V&A Museum of Childhood

Take a trip down memory lane and keep kids entertained with a visit to the V&A Museum of Childhood. Join in with free daily activities, from storytelling to treasure hunts, or explore the collections of rag dolls, teddy bears and dolls’ houses dating from the 1600s. Entry is free, some charges apply.

For more information please visit the Visit London

British Transport Museum
There are lots of fun things to do in London for kids of all ages. Many London attractions are free so you can find activities for kids without spending a small fortune.

From the Natural History Museum to the British Museum, there are a whole host of places to visit in London which provide activities for kids. Most London museums offer special programmes of free activities for children and almost all are free to enter!

Whether you’re looking for things to see at the V&A, exploring the gardens at the Horniman, or taking a trip of discovery at the Science Museum, take your pick of the top family-friendly museums in London listed below.

Bank of England Museum

Teach your kids the value of money the fun way at the Bank of England Museum. Look at gold bars dating from ancient times – and test your strength by trying to lift one – hear unexpected tales about the Bank’s ghostly nun, and find out how the pound sign was developed. Admission is free and includes an activity sheet.

The British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s greatest museums, showcasing objects from prehistoric to modern times. Highlights include the Rosetta Stone and the mummies in the Ancient Egypt collection. Entry is free but special exhibitions require tickets. There are free activity backpacks available as well as special events tailored towards children.

The Geffrye Museum

Take your kids on a walk through time and explore the history of English interiors at the Geffrye Museum, set in 18th-century almshouses. Entry is free for the main museum. There is a charge for adults entering the restored almshouse but entry is still free for children under 16.

HMS Belfast

Step aboard Europe’s largest preserved WW2 warship and experience the legend that is the HMS Belfast. The ship has nine decks steeped in history, from the Captain’s Bridge to the sailor’s mess, and offers hands-on activities for children. Children under 16 go free. Free audio tours are also available.

Horniman Museum and Gardens

The Horniman Museum is a children’s paradise. As well as a fantastic programme of free activities for kids, it has an aquarium, a hands-on centre and a Nature Base, complete with live animals, plus 16 acres of beautiful gardens perfect for picnics. Entry is free, with charges for the aquarium and some exhibitions.

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum hosts exhibitions connecting transport with the history of London. Inside you’ll find more than 80 vehicles, including a red London bus and the world’s first Underground train. The galleries are full of exhibits for children to play on. Look out for Interchange, the children’s interactive area. Free entry for under 17s.

Museum of London

Take the kids on an unforgettable journey into the story of London’s past – from a time when lions roamed Trafalgar Square, through the city under Roman rule, to the 21st century capital: there’s something for all ages. Don’t miss the Galleries of Modern London, too. Entry is free, as are family events at weekends.

Museum of London Docklands

At Museum of London Docklands kids can explore the history of the river Thames, discover the fate of captured pirates and take cover in a WW2 bomb shelter. Let them loose in the Mudlarks Gallery with a soft play area for younger children and interactive exhibits for older kids. Entry is free, as are family events on Saturdays.

National Maritime Museum

In the heart of Greenwich, the National Maritime Museum offers plenty to engage and entertain young minds, from loading a cargo ship and firing a cannon at pirates and steer a ship into port in the Children’s Gallery. Entry is free and the museum also runs a programme of free family events at weekends.

Natural History Museum

Meet a life-sized blue whale, a roaring T-Rex and a gigantic crocodile; the Natural History Museum has something to keep all young visitors entertained. Delve into the Darwin Centre, get hands-on at Investigate – the science lab for 7-14 year olds – or get shaken up in the earthquake machine. Entry is free, some charges apply.

Science Museum

Museums in London don’t get more family friendly than the Science Museum! Trace the history of the space rocket, meet Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel and catch a 3D movie; all for free. There are galleries for under 5s, the Pattern Pod for 5-8-year-olds and Launchpad, a hands-on exhibition for teenagers. Some charges apply.

V&A Museum of Childhood

Take a trip down memory lane and keep kids entertained with a visit to the V&A Museum of Childhood. Join in with free daily activities, from storytelling to treasure hunts, or explore the collections of rag dolls, teddy bears and dolls’ houses dating from the 1600s. Entry is free, some charges apply.

For more information please visit the Visit London

British Transport Museum
There are lots of fun things to do in London for kids of all ages. Many London attractions are free so you can find activities for kids without spending a small fortune.

From the Natural History Museum to the British Museum, there are a whole host of places to visit in London which provide activities for kids. Most London museums offer special programmes of free activities for children and almost all are free to enter!

Whether you’re looking for things to see at the V&A, exploring the gardens at the Horniman, or taking a trip of discovery at the Science Museum, take your pick of the top family-friendly museums in London listed below.

Bank of England Museum

Teach your kids the value of money the fun way at the Bank of England Museum. Look at gold bars dating from ancient times – and test your strength by trying to lift one – hear unexpected tales about the Bank’s ghostly nun, and find out how the pound sign was developed. Admission is free and includes an activity sheet.

The British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s greatest museums, showcasing objects from prehistoric to modern times. Highlights include the Rosetta Stone and the mummies in the Ancient Egypt collection. Entry is free but special exhibitions require tickets. There are free activity backpacks available as well as special events tailored towards children.

The Geffrye Museum

Take your kids on a walk through time and explore the history of English interiors at the Geffrye Museum, set in 18th-century almshouses. Entry is free for the main museum. There is a charge for adults entering the restored almshouse but entry is still free for children under 16.

HMS Belfast

Step aboard Europe’s largest preserved WW2 warship and experience the legend that is the HMS Belfast. The ship has nine decks steeped in history, from the Captain’s Bridge to the sailor’s mess, and offers hands-on activities for children. Children under 16 go free. Free audio tours are also available.

Horniman Museum and Gardens

The Horniman Museum is a children’s paradise. As well as a fantastic programme of free activities for kids, it has an aquarium, a hands-on centre and a Nature Base, complete with live animals, plus 16 acres of beautiful gardens perfect for picnics. Entry is free, with charges for the aquarium and some exhibitions.

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum hosts exhibitions connecting transport with the history of London. Inside you’ll find more than 80 vehicles, including a red London bus and the world’s first Underground train. The galleries are full of exhibits for children to play on. Look out for Interchange, the children’s interactive area. Free entry for under 17s.

Museum of London

Take the kids on an unforgettable journey into the story of London’s past – from a time when lions roamed Trafalgar Square, through the city under Roman rule, to the 21st century capital: there’s something for all ages. Don’t miss the Galleries of Modern London, too. Entry is free, as are family events at weekends.

Museum of London Docklands

At Museum of London Docklands kids can explore the history of the river Thames, discover the fate of captured pirates and take cover in a WW2 bomb shelter. Let them loose in the Mudlarks Gallery with a soft play area for younger children and interactive exhibits for older kids. Entry is free, as are family events on Saturdays.

National Maritime Museum

In the heart of Greenwich, the National Maritime Museum offers plenty to engage and entertain young minds, from loading a cargo ship and firing a cannon at pirates and steer a ship into port in the Children’s Gallery. Entry is free and the museum also runs a programme of free family events at weekends.

Natural History Museum

Meet a life-sized blue whale, a roaring T-Rex and a gigantic crocodile; the Natural History Museum has something to keep all young visitors entertained. Delve into the Darwin Centre, get hands-on at Investigate – the science lab for 7-14 year olds – or get shaken up in the earthquake machine. Entry is free, some charges apply.

Science Museum

Museums in London don’t get more family friendly than the Science Museum! Trace the history of the space rocket, meet Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel and catch a 3D movie; all for free. There are galleries for under 5s, the Pattern Pod for 5-8-year-olds and Launchpad, a hands-on exhibition for teenagers. Some charges apply.

V&A Museum of Childhood

Take a trip down memory lane and keep kids entertained with a visit to the V&A Museum of Childhood. Join in with free daily activities, from storytelling to treasure hunts, or explore the collections of rag dolls, teddy bears and dolls’ houses dating from the 1600s. Entry is free, some charges apply.

For more information please visit the Visit London

British Transport Museum
There are lots of fun things to do in London for kids of all ages. Many London attractions are free so you can find activities for kids without spending a small fortune.

From the Natural History Museum to the British Museum, there are a whole host of places to visit in London which provide activities for kids. Most London museums offer special programmes of free activities for children and almost all are free to enter!

Whether you’re looking for things to see at the V&A, exploring the gardens at the Horniman, or taking a trip of discovery at the Science Museum, take your pick of the top family-friendly museums in London listed below.

Bank of England Museum

Teach your kids the value of money the fun way at the Bank of England Museum. Look at gold bars dating from ancient times – and test your strength by trying to lift one – hear unexpected tales about the Bank’s ghostly nun, and find out how the pound sign was developed. Admission is free and includes an activity sheet.

The British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s greatest museums, showcasing objects from prehistoric to modern times. Highlights include the Rosetta Stone and the mummies in the Ancient Egypt collection. Entry is free but special exhibitions require tickets. There are free activity backpacks available as well as special events tailored towards children.

The Geffrye Museum

Take your kids on a walk through time and explore the history of English interiors at the Geffrye Museum, set in 18th-century almshouses. Entry is free for the main museum. There is a charge for adults entering the restored almshouse but entry is still free for children under 16.

HMS Belfast

Step aboard Europe’s largest preserved WW2 warship and experience the legend that is the HMS Belfast. The ship has nine decks steeped in history, from the Captain’s Bridge to the sailor’s mess, and offers hands-on activities for children. Children under 16 go free. Free audio tours are also available.

Horniman Museum and Gardens

The Horniman Museum is a children’s paradise. As well as a fantastic programme of free activities for kids, it has an aquarium, a hands-on centre and a Nature Base, complete with live animals, plus 16 acres of beautiful gardens perfect for picnics. Entry is free, with charges for the aquarium and some exhibitions.

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum hosts exhibitions connecting transport with the history of London. Inside you’ll find more than 80 vehicles, including a red London bus and the world’s first Underground train. The galleries are full of exhibits for children to play on. Look out for Interchange, the children’s interactive area. Free entry for under 17s.

Museum of London

Take the kids on an unforgettable journey into the story of London’s past – from a time when lions roamed Trafalgar Square, through the city under Roman rule, to the 21st century capital: there’s something for all ages. Don’t miss the Galleries of Modern London, too. Entry is free, as are family events at weekends.

Museum of London Docklands

At Museum of London Docklands kids can explore the history of the river Thames, discover the fate of captured pirates and take cover in a WW2 bomb shelter. Let them loose in the Mudlarks Gallery with a soft play area for younger children and interactive exhibits for older kids. Entry is free, as are family events on Saturdays.

National Maritime Museum

In the heart of Greenwich, the National Maritime Museum offers plenty to engage and entertain young minds, from loading a cargo ship and firing a cannon at pirates and steer a ship into port in the Children’s Gallery. Entry is free and the museum also runs a programme of free family events at weekends.

Natural History Museum

Meet a life-sized blue whale, a roaring T-Rex and a gigantic crocodile; the Natural History Museum has something to keep all young visitors entertained. Delve into the Darwin Centre, get hands-on at Investigate – the science lab for 7-14 year olds – or get shaken up in the earthquake machine. Entry is free, some charges apply.

Science Museum

Museums in London don’t get more family friendly than the Science Museum! Trace the history of the space rocket, meet Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel and catch a 3D movie; all for free. There are galleries for under 5s, the Pattern Pod for 5-8-year-olds and Launchpad, a hands-on exhibition for teenagers. Some charges apply.

V&A Museum of Childhood

Take a trip down memory lane and keep kids entertained with a visit to the V&A Museum of Childhood. Join in with free daily activities, from storytelling to treasure hunts, or explore the collections of rag dolls, teddy bears and dolls’ houses dating from the 1600s. Entry is free, some charges apply.

For more information please visit the Visit London

British Transport Museum
There are lots of fun things to do in London for kids of all ages. Many London attractions are free so you can find activities for kids without spending a small fortune.

From the Natural History Museum to the British Museum, there are a whole host of places to visit in London which provide activities for kids. Most London museums offer special programmes of free activities for children and almost all are free to enter!

Whether you’re looking for things to see at the V&A, exploring the gardens at the Horniman, or taking a trip of discovery at the Science Museum, take your pick of the top family-friendly museums in London listed below.

Bank of England Museum

Teach your kids the value of money the fun way at the Bank of England Museum. Look at gold bars dating from ancient times – and test your strength by trying to lift one – hear unexpected tales about the Bank’s ghostly nun, and find out how the pound sign was developed. Admission is free and includes an activity sheet.

The British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s greatest museums, showcasing objects from prehistoric to modern times. Highlights include the Rosetta Stone and the mummies in the Ancient Egypt collection. Entry is free but special exhibitions require tickets. There are free activity backpacks available as well as special events tailored towards children.

The Geffrye Museum

Take your kids on a walk through time and explore the history of English interiors at the Geffrye Museum, set in 18th-century almshouses. Entry is free for the main museum. There is a charge for adults entering the restored almshouse but entry is still free for children under 16.

HMS Belfast

Step aboard Europe’s largest preserved WW2 warship and experience the legend that is the HMS Belfast. The ship has nine decks steeped in history, from the Captain’s Bridge to the sailor’s mess, and offers hands-on activities for children. Children under 16 go free. Free audio tours are also available.

Horniman Museum and Gardens

The Horniman Museum is a children’s paradise. As well as a fantastic programme of free activities for kids, it has an aquarium, a hands-on centre and a Nature Base, complete with live animals, plus 16 acres of beautiful gardens perfect for picnics. Entry is free, with charges for the aquarium and some exhibitions.

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum hosts exhibitions connecting transport with the history of London. Inside you’ll find more than 80 vehicles, including a red London bus and the world’s first Underground train. The galleries are full of exhibits for children to play on. Look out for Interchange, the children’s interactive area. Free entry for under 17s.

Museum of London

Take the kids on an unforgettable journey into the story of London’s past – from a time when lions roamed Trafalgar Square, through the city under Roman rule, to the 21st century capital: there’s something for all ages. Don’t miss the Galleries of Modern London, too. Entry is free, as are family events at weekends.

Museum of London Docklands

At Museum of London Docklands kids can explore the history of the river Thames, discover the fate of captured pirates and take cover in a WW2 bomb shelter. Let them loose in the Mudlarks Gallery with a soft play area for younger children and interactive exhibits for older kids. Entry is free, as are family events on Saturdays.

National Maritime Museum

In the heart of Greenwich, the National Maritime Museum offers plenty to engage and entertain young minds, from loading a cargo ship and firing a cannon at pirates and steer a ship into port in the Children’s Gallery. Entry is free and the museum also runs a programme of free family events at weekends.

Natural History Museum

Meet a life-sized blue whale, a roaring T-Rex and a gigantic crocodile; the Natural History Museum has something to keep all young visitors entertained. Delve into the Darwin Centre, get hands-on at Investigate – the science lab for 7-14 year olds – or get shaken up in the earthquake machine. Entry is free, some charges apply.

Science Museum

Museums in London don’t get more family friendly than the Science Museum! Trace the history of the space rocket, meet Sir Isambard Kingdom Brunel and catch a 3D movie; all for free. There are galleries for under 5s, the Pattern Pod for 5-8-year-olds and Launchpad, a hands-on exhibition for teenagers. Some charges apply.

V&A Museum of Childhood

Take a trip down memory lane and keep kids entertained with a visit to the V&A Museum of Childhood. Join in with free daily activities, from storytelling to treasure hunts, or explore the collections of rag dolls, teddy bears and dolls’ houses dating from the 1600s. Entry is free, some charges apply.

For more information please visit the Visit London Website.

English Courses at The Burlington School London

Welcome to the Burlington School where we provide you with high quality English courses in London.

With over 20 years’ experience in teaching English as a foreign language to students from all over the world, we know you will find something to meet your English language objectives.

We are sure you will find an English course suitable for you, whether you are looking for General English, Business English, Exam preparation, junior or group courses. We guarantee you will have a memorable time with us!

We are looking forward to having you as part of our student community and we hope that your London experience here will be academically challenging and personally rewarding.

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